Frederick Ayrton

Frederick Ayrton

b: 1780
d: 24 NOV 1824
Supreme Court,
Bombay,
India
From 'The Chaplin and Skinner Families' page 22:

>> Frederick Ayrton, above referred to, the second son of Thomas Ayrton, became like his father a solicitor. He was admitted in 1802, and practised at 1 Field Court, Grays Inn, until 1809, when he removed to 15 Grays Inn Square, where he remained until 1817, with the exception of the years 1812 and 1813, when he was at 66 Great Queen Street, Lincoln's Inn Fields.

On the 1st June 1811, he was married to Juliana Caroline Rebecca Adriana, daughter of Colonel Edward Nugent, at the parish church of St. Luke's, Chelsea, by the Rev. R. F. Bree, whom I believe to have been the second son of Dr. Robert Bree, and therefore a first cousin of Colonel Nugent.

In January, 1818, soon after the birth of his youngest son, John Hyde Ayrton, Mr. Frederick Ayrton went out to India, and the story of his family life and of his death in India in the year 1823 are best told by his daughter, Matilda Adriana Chaplin, in her 'Memoir' in the following words:-

'My father was a London lawyer of small means, with a large mind and original ideas ... the reason we lived at Richmond was that he and some friends were experimenting with merino sheep, and he, thinking that country air was good for children, managed this business near that park. Well, I suppose it did not answer. I do not remember our house there. My brother Edward was born there in 1815; and also Acton in 1816. Then they moved to Kew. I was born at Chelsea, 1813, where rny parents were then living. After their marriage on very slender means, they lived at, or close to, my father's chambers, and there my brother Frederick was born in 1811. My first "house" memory is at Kew; at the church there Acton was christened, and John was born there in 1818.

My father used to come home on Saturdays and stay till Mondays; his presence was to me a great pleasure, and I prevailed upon him to let me see him have his dinner; I don't think I ever had any of it, as he was extremely careful about our diet; and our health in general was governed by him - my mother thought he knew more about everything than any one else, and obeyed him in all nursery details in perfect faith. We went out in all weathers, well protected; our feet kept dry with over shoes of leather; there were no India rubber ones in those days, coats down to our heels, ears to the boy's caps, and a veil for me. My general impression of my mother at this time is a tall lady, dressed in white, working at childrens' clothes and telling us stories, often jumping up excitedly about some mischief a child was doing, or some noise of breakage. Just now I was told one Saturday a lady wanted to see me; my hair was duly brushed, I went down stairs, and there sitting on the chimney piece was a jointed doll, the first my mother or I had ever seen. It had been smartly dressed by my grandmother Nugent in London, and my father had brought it as a novelty for me.

My father was always spoken of to us as a perfect man, who knew everything, and could do anything, even carpentering, upholstering, and shoemaking, which we thought much cleverer than writing an essay or review, which he did in hours that were not filled more profitably. The children came faster than the fees, so to secure a good education for them he accepted an opening for practice in the Supreme Court, Bombay. My mother lived with the greatest economy that he might the sooner have made enough money to return. We were quite aware of all this. If we wanted to have things or to incur any expense, we used to he told papa would never come back if we spent so much. She only kept up the intimacy of a very few old friends, as the family cares absorbed her time. Now and then at her father's request, she would go with her mother to make a grand visit, with her footman carrying a long gilt-headed stick behind them.

'I was put to bed and was ill some time with fever, my mother watching me day and night. At this time we were daily expecting my father's return from India, and one day the servant brought up a rather large letter. "The banker" said my mother; she opened it, began to read, gave a sort of shriek, and left the room. I was in bed too weak to move. I lay wondering what it was. I had heard of people losing all their money, and thought the banker had written to say we had lost all ours, like the West Indians we knew. I was not much distressed, and began planning how we should live, which amused me. Then I heard grandpapa's (Col. Edward Nugent's) step, and directly felt satisfied that he would make mamma happy. Then the servant who had gone to fetch him came to me. When I asked her after mamma, she said, "She can't come in because she is crying so! Your pa is dead!" I could hardly believe her, for I had daily been talking about what we should do when he came home, and wondering whether I should remember all I had learned at school if he questioned me. The doctor came in to see me, and ordered a mixture for mamma, which I always think of now when I smell ether.

Her friend-at-need, my godmother Miss Smee, came and sat up all night, and mamma without undressing, at last, I suppose, fell asleep on the bed by my side. The next day the boys came from school'. <<


Letter from Bombay (one of the letters kept by E I Chaplin nee Skinner, passed down to Alan Ray-Jones:

Bombay 2 December 1824

Dear Madam,

It is my painful duty to communicate to you the death of Mr Ayrton on the 24 November last. He has not left any Will in this country, but I believe a Will is with Col Nugent. This I collected from occasional Conversation with him. The Registrar of the Supreme Court here will administer his Estate - he has left in this country about 800£ (?) after the arrangement of his affairs, it will certainly produce 750£ (?); upon which latter sum you may rely with confidence - it may be more but not less. It will give me pleasure to hear that you are handsomely provided by the Will that I have alluded to - if no such Will exists, you will then be entitled by Law to one third, and your children to the other two thirds. I trust no inconvenience will be sustained by you for want of funds in the mean time. I will consult with the Registrar and recommend him to remit to you the same allowance as Mr Ayrton himself remitted to you annually viz 500£. I shall hereafter send you further particulars, and shall feel happy at any communication from you.

I am Dear Madam
Your faithful Servant
J B. Graham.
To Mrs Ayrton


END
Frederick Ayrton Jnr, born 1812, son of Frederick Ayrton and Juliana Nugent.

There were three Frederick Ayrtons in a row:

1. Frederick, son of Thomas Ayrton, solicitor, born in 1780, who became a lawyer, married Juliana Nugent, had several children including Matilda Adriana Ayrton and her brothers, and died in India while the children were young. Frederick and Juliana were my great (x3) grandparents.

2. Their eldest son Frederick, born in 1812 in Chelsea, became an engineer and married Margaret Hicks in 1833. He had an interesting life as a soldier, engineer and lawyer, much of it spent abroad in India, Aden and Egypt – see Family Historian and the Chaplin and Skinner book. He died in 1873, in either Margate or London. These letters are to do with him.

3. His son Frederick, born in 1836, about whom I know nothing except that he married a French woman.

Alan Ray-Jones

1824 - Death of Frederick
Monday 16 June [1873]

Dear Mrs Chaplin

I write to tell you that I was summoned to Folkestone on Thursday last by your brother Frederick who had reached that place two days before in charge of Dr Pascale from Nice. I found him very bad and recommended his being brought up to London forthwith to be placed under the care of Dr Joy of Grosvenor St recommended by Dr Drummond at Nice.

I brought him up later on Thursday evening to his own house, No 4 Arundel Gardens, where he is being attended by Drs Joy and Bantock, and kindly cared for in every way by his wife. I think him better than when he left Folkestone. Hitherto he has not wished me to tell of his arrival but on asking him this morning whether I might not communicate the intelligence to you he said “Yes, but I cannot bear talking.” You will act on this information as you decide best.

Yours faithfully,

G P Badger

PS: Mr Frederick Ayrton wishes me to add that he was married by special license from the Archbishop of Canterbury.
Biography
Supreme Court,
Bombay,
India From 'The Chaplin and Skinner Families' page 22:

>> Frederick Ayrton, above referred to, the second son of Thomas Ayrton, became like his father a solicitor. He was admitted in 1802, and practised at 1 Field Court, Grays Inn, until 1809, when he removed to 15 Grays Inn Square, where he remained until 1817, with the exception of the years 1812 and 1813, when he was at 66 Great Queen Street, Lincoln's Inn Fields.

On the 1st June 1811, he was married to Juliana Caroline Rebecca Adriana, daughter of Colonel Edward Nugent, at the parish church of St. Luke's, Chelsea, by the Rev. R. F. Bree, whom I believe to have been the second son of Dr. Robert Bree, and therefore a first cousin of Colonel Nugent.

In January, 1818, soon after the birth of his youngest son, John Hyde Ayrton, Mr. Frederick Ayrton went out to India, and the story of his family life and of his death in India in the year 1823 are best told by his daughter, Matilda Adriana Chaplin, in her 'Memoir' in the following words:-

'My father was a London lawyer of small means, with a large mind and original ideas ... the reason we lived at Richmond was that he and some friends were experimenting with merino sheep, and he, thinking that country air was good for children, managed this business near that park. Well, I suppose it did not answer. I do not remember our house there. My brother Edward was born there in 1815; and also Acton in 1816. Then they moved to Kew. I was born at Chelsea, 1813, where rny parents were then living. After their marriage on very slender means, they lived at, or close to, my father's chambers, and there my brother Frederick was born in 1811. My first "house" memory is at Kew; at the church there Acton was christened, and John was born there in 1818.

My father used to come home on Saturdays and stay till Mondays; his presence was to me a great pleasure, and I prevailed upon him to let me see him have his dinner; I don't think I ever had any of it, as he was extremely careful about our diet; and our health in general was governed by him - my mother thought he knew more about everything than any one else, and obeyed him in all nursery details in perfect faith. We went out in all weathers, well protected; our feet kept dry with over shoes of leather; there were no India rubber ones in those days, coats down to our heels, ears to the boy's caps, and a veil for me. My general impression of my mother at this time is a tall lady, dressed in white, working at childrens' clothes and telling us stories, often jumping up excitedly about some mischief a child was doing, or some noise of breakage. Just now I was told one Saturday a lady wanted to see me; my hair was duly brushed, I went down stairs, and there sitting on the chimney piece was a jointed doll, the first my mother or I had ever seen. It had been smartly dressed by my grandmother Nugent in London, and my father had brought it as a novelty for me.

My father was always spoken of to us as a perfect man, who knew everything, and could do anything, even carpentering, upholstering, and shoemaking, which we thought much cleverer than writing an essay or review, which he did in hours that were not filled more profitably. The children came faster than the fees, so to secure a good education for them he accepted an opening for practice in the Supreme Court, Bombay. My mother lived with the greatest economy that he might the sooner have made enough money to return. We were quite aware of all this. If we wanted to have things or to incur any expense, we used to he told papa would never come back if we spent so much. She only kept up the intimacy of a very few old friends, as the family cares absorbed her time. Now and then at her father's request, she would go with her mother to make a grand visit, with her footman carrying a long gilt-headed stick behind them.

'I was put to bed and was ill some time with fever, my mother watching me day and night. At this time we were daily expecting my father's return from India, and one day the servant brought up a rather large letter. "The banker" said my mother; she opened it, began to read, gave a sort of shriek, and left the room. I was in bed too weak to move. I lay wondering what it was. I had heard of people losing all their money, and thought the banker had written to say we had lost all ours, like the West Indians we knew. I was not much distressed, and began planning how we should live, which amused me. Then I heard grandpapa's (Col. Edward Nugent's) step, and directly felt satisfied that he would make mamma happy. Then the servant who had gone to fetch him came to me. When I asked her after mamma, she said, "She can't come in because she is crying so! Your pa is dead!" I could hardly believe her, for I had daily been talking about what we should do when he came home, and wondering whether I should remember all I had learned at school if he questioned me. The doctor came in to see me, and ordered a mixture for mamma, which I always think of now when I smell ether.

Her friend-at-need, my godmother Miss Smee, came and sat up all night, and mamma without undressing, at last, I suppose, fell asleep on the bed by my side. The next day the boys came from school'. <<


Letter from Bombay (one of the letters kept by E I Chaplin nee Skinner, passed down to Alan Ray-Jones:

Bombay 2 December 1824

Dear Madam,

It is my painful duty to communicate to you the death of Mr Ayrton on the 24 November last. He has not left any Will in this country, but I believe a Will is with Col Nugent. This I collected from occasional Conversation with him. The Registrar of the Supreme Court here will administer his Estate - he has left in this country about 800£ (?) after the arrangement of his affairs, it will certainly produce 750£ (?); upon which latter sum you may rely with confidence - it may be more but not less. It will give me pleasure to hear that you are handsomely provided by the Will that I have alluded to - if no such Will exists, you will then be entitled by Law to one third, and your children to the other two thirds. I trust no inconvenience will be sustained by you for want of funds in the mean time. I will consult with the Registrar and recommend him to remit to you the same allowance as Mr Ayrton himself remitted to you annually viz 500£. I shall hereafter send you further particulars, and shall feel happy at any communication from you.

I am Dear Madam
Your faithful Servant
J B. Graham.
To Mrs Ayrton


END Frederick Ayrton Jnr, born 1812, son of Frederick Ayrton and Juliana Nugent.

There were three Frederick Ayrtons in a row:

1. Frederick, son of Thomas Ayrton, solicitor, born in 1780, who became a lawyer, married Juliana Nugent, had several children including Matilda Adriana Ayrton and her brothers, and died in India while the children were young. Frederick and Juliana were my great (x3) grandparents.

2. Their eldest son Frederick, born in 1812 in Chelsea, became an engineer and married Margaret Hicks in 1833. He had an interesting life as a soldier, engineer and lawyer, much of it spent abroad in India, Aden and Egypt – see Family Historian and the Chaplin and Skinner book. He died in 1873, in either Margate or London. These letters are to do with him.

3. His son Frederick, born in 1836, about whom I know nothing except that he married a French woman.

Alan Ray-Jones
1824 - Death of Frederick
Monday 16 June [1873]

Dear Mrs Chaplin

I write to tell you that I was summoned to Folkestone on Thursday last by your brother Frederick who had reached that place two days before in charge of Dr Pascale from Nice. I found him very bad and recommended his being brought up to London forthwith to be placed under the care of Dr Joy of Grosvenor St recommended by Dr Drummond at Nice.

I brought him up later on Thursday evening to his own house, No 4 Arundel Gardens, where he is being attended by Drs Joy and Bantock, and kindly cared for in every way by his wife. I think him better than when he left Folkestone. Hitherto he has not wished me to tell of his arrival but on asking him this morning whether I might not communicate the intelligence to you he said “Yes, but I cannot bear talking.” You will act on this information as you decide best.

Yours faithfully,

G P Badger

PS: Mr Frederick Ayrton wishes me to add that he was married by special license from the Archbishop of Canterbury.
Facts
  • 1780 - Birth - ; London. Christened 6 April 1780 at Saint Andrew, Holborn.
  • 6 APR 1780 - Baptism - ; London
  • 24 NOV 1824 - Death - ; Bombay, India
  • 1802 - Fact -
  • 1809 - Fact -
  • 1817 - Fact -
  • 1818 - Fact - ; Bombay
  • 27 JAN 1802 - Education - Grays Inn ; London
  • ABT 1805 - Occupation - Barrister ; Grays Inn, London
  • 1812 - Occupation - Barrister
Ancestors
   
 
 
Thomas Ayrton
1744 - 1811
  
  
  
?
 
Frederick Ayrton
1780 - 24 NOV 1824
  
 
  
 
 
Ann Hodges
30 OCT 1754 -
  
  
  
 
Family Group Sheet - Child
PARENT (M) Thomas Ayrton
Birth1744Ripon, Yorkshire
Death1811
Marriage11 APR 1775to Ann Hodges at St. George's, Hanover Square, London
FatherFrancis Ayrton , Rev
Mother?
PARENT (F) Ann Hodges
Birth30 OCT 1754(Date of christening, at Newent, Gloucestershire)
Death
Marriage11 APR 1775to Thomas Ayrton at St. George's, Hanover Square, London
FatherWilliam Hodges
MotherSusanah
CHILDREN
MFrederick Ayrton
Birth1780London. Christened 6 April 1780 at Saint Andrew, Holborn.
Death24 NOV 1824Bombay, India
Marriage1 JUN 1811to Juliana Caroline Rebecca Adriana Nugent at St. Lukes Church, Chelsea, London
MEdwin William Ayrton
Birth1778
Death
Marriage(1803?)to Eliza George
MAlfred Ayrton
Birth1784
Death8 MAR 1858
FMatilda Ayrton
Birth1788
Death1813
Marriageto ? Cater
Family Group Sheet - Spouse
PARENT (M) Frederick Ayrton
Birth1780London. Christened 6 April 1780 at Saint Andrew, Holborn.
Death24 NOV 1824 Bombay, India
Marriage1 JUN 1811to Juliana Caroline Rebecca Adriana Nugent at St. Lukes Church, Chelsea, London
FatherThomas Ayrton
MotherAnn Hodges
PARENT (F) Juliana Caroline Rebecca Adriana Nugent
BirthAFT 1787
Death10 MAR 1833
Marriage1 JUN 1811to Frederick Ayrton at St. Lukes Church, Chelsea, London
FatherEdward Nugent , Col.
MotherAdriana Spencer
CHILDREN
FMatilda Adriana Ayrton
Birth1 JUN 1813Chelsea, London (baptised Richmond according to Andi Smith)
Death26 JAN 189998 Palace Gardens Terrace, Kensington, London.
Marriage6 APR 1835to John Clarke Chaplin at Marylebone, London (New Church)
MEdward Nugent Ayrton
Birth13 MAR 1815Richmond, Surrey, christened Saint Mary Magdalen, Richmond 23 April 1815
Death28 NOV 1873Buried at Bexhill, Sussex, west of St Leonard's, NOT Box Hill.
Marriage28 AUG 1866to Emma Sophie Althof at Parish Church, Freshwater, Isle of Wight
MFrederick Ayrton
Birth20 MAR 1812Chelsea, London
Death20 JUN 1873Arundel Gardens, London
Marriage13 AUG 1833to Margaret Hicks at St Paul's, Walden, Hertfordshire. Witnesses were J C Chaplin and his two sisters, M A Ayrton and her brother Edward Nuge
MActon Smee Ayrton
Birth5 AUG 1816Richmond, London
Death30 NOV 1886Mont Doré Hotel, Bournemouth
MJohn Hyde Ayrton
Birth4 JAN 1818Kew, London
Death1845Sawent Warree, India
Evidence
[S11621] International Genealogical Index (in FamilySearch by Intellectual Reserve Inc, Salt Lake City) Church of Latter Day Saints (Mormons, LDS)
[S37942] Raymond Airton emails etc from 19 July 2006 (and some earlier)
[S24857] FTM Notes on same person
[S15775] 'Dictionary of National Biography'
Descendancy Chart
Frederick Ayrton b: 1780 d: 24 NOV 1824
Juliana Caroline Rebecca Adriana Nugent b: AFT 1787 d: 10 MAR 1833
Matilda Adriana Ayrton b: 1 JUN 1813 d: 26 JAN 1899
John Clarke Chaplin b: 25 AUG 1806 d: 2 JUN 1856
Holroyd Chaplin b: 17 MAR 1840 d: 23 DEC 1917
Euphemia Isabella Skinner b: 7 JUN 1847 d: 10 SEP 1939
Irene Kate Chaplin b: 1 MAR 1873 d: 22 JUN 1962
John William Ernest Pearce b: 4 APR 1864 d: 25 JAN 1951
Edward Holroyd Pearce , Lord b: 9 FEB 1901 d: 27 NOV 1990
Erica Priestman b: 1906 d: DEC 1985
Richard Bruce Holroyd Pearce b: 12 MAY 1930 d: 1987
James Edward Holroyd Pearce b: 18 MAR 1934 d: 11 JUN 1985
Phyllis Margaret Pearce b: 8 FEB 1910 d: 6 JUN 1973
Edward Douglas Eade b: 7 FEB 1911 d: 24 DEC 1984
John Allan Chaplin Pearce b: 21 OCT 1912 d: 15 SEP 2006
Helen Nugent Pearce b: 22 NOV 1917 d: 6 APR 1920
Effie Irene Pearce b: 18 AUG 1899 d: 26 JAN 1996
Raymond Ray-Jones R.E., A.R.C.A. b: 31 AUG 1886 d: 26 FEB 1942
Holroyd Anthony Ray-Jones b: 7 JUN 1941 d: 13 MAR 1972
Allan Nugent Chaplin b: 8 JUN 1871 d: 1917
Son Chaplin b: 29 NOV 1900 d: ABT 29 NOV 1900
Matilda Effie Chaplin b: 20 JUN 1874 d: 20 DEC 1874
Phyllis Chaplin b: 7 JUN 1879 d: 27 JUL 1924
Philip Herbert Cowell b: 1870 d: 1949
Theodoric Chaplin b: 14 FEB 1881 d: 29 OCT 1906
Daphne Grace Chaplin b: 6 SEP 1884 d: 16 FEB 1964
Daphne Grace Chaplin b: 6 SEP 1884 d: 16 FEB 1964
Cecil Arbuthnot Gould b: 1883 d: 1917
Allan Chaplin , Col b: 20 JUN 1844 d: 19 AUG 1910
Maud Elizabeth Skinner b: 25 OCT 1844 d: 24 JUN 1904
Wyndham Allan Chaplin , Mus. Bac. Oxon., Rev b: 12 NOV 1872 d: 29 AUG 1914
Mabel Florance Ida Chaplin b: 7 OCT 1875 d: 1970
Charles Nugent Hope-Wallace b: 3 FEB 1877 d: 15 OCT 1953
Philip Hope-Wallace b: NOV 1911 d: 1979
Nina Mary Hope-Wallace b: 14 DEC 1905 d: 1995
Edward O'Bryen Hoare , Sir b: 29 APR 1898 d: 1969
Maud Dorothea Fanny Chaplin b: 23 JUL 1880 d: 6 NOV 1899
Louisa Sarah Chaplin b: 23 APR 1838 d: 9 JUL 1897
John Edwin Hilary Skinner b: 11 JAN 1839 d: 20 NOV 1894
John Allan Cleveland Skinner b: 19 SEP 1865 d: 8 SEP 1925
Hilary Francis Cleveland Skinner b: 10 OCT 1889 d: 25 JUL 1916
John Adrian Dudley Skinner b: 2 SEP 1891 d: 30 MAY 1965
Bruce Allan Maclean Skinner b: 29 AUG 1927 d: 2002
Caroline Louisa Marianne Skinner b: 22 FEB 1873 d: 20 JUN 1936
Roandeu Albert Henry Bickford-Smith b: 3 MAY 1859 d: 13 DEC 1916
William Nugent Venning Bickford-Smith b: 14 MAY 1892 d: 3 SEP 1975
Amy Evelyn Holme b: 6 SEP 1906 d: 21 JUL 1979
Leslie Evelyn Bickford-Smith b: 1928 d: 1990
Leonard James Jacob b: 1928 d: 1989
John Allan Bickford-Smith Capt RN b: 23 APR 1895 d: 8 MAY 1970
Joan Angel Allsebrook Simon b: 8 AUG 1901 d: 13 APR 1991
Norman Kennedy d: 1926
Aubrey Louis Bickford-Smith b: 4 FEB 1902 d: 9 JUL 1975
Roger Bickford-Smith b: 1939 d: 1997
Clifton Wyndham Hilary Skinner , R.F.A. b: 26 MAR 1880 d: 17 FEB 1908
Ayrton Chaplin , Rev b: 19 OCT 1842 d: 1930
Edith Elizabeth Pyne b: 28 SEP 1845 d: 1928
Ursula (Ulla) Chaplin , M.D. b: 30 NOV 1869 d: 1937
Adriana (Audrey) Chaplin b: 26 APR 1872 d: 15 DEC 1945
Ursula Joan Gregory b: 29 JUL 1896 d: 17 JUL 1959
Christopher John (Kit) Gregory b: 11 JUL 1900 d: 1977
Marion Eastty Black b: 3 MAY 1902 d: AUG 1998
Elizabeth Gregory b: 22 OCT 1933 d: 1938
Henry Ayrton Chaplin , L.R.C.P. & S. b: 21 AUG 1876 d: 2 JUL 1905
Matilda Charlotte Chaplin , M.D. b: 20 JUN 1846 d: 19 JUL 1883
William Edward Ayrton , F.R.S. F.R.S. b: 14 SEP 1847 d: 6 NOV 1908
Edith Chaplin Ayrton b: 1 OCT 1874 d: 5 MAY 1945
Israel Zangwill b: 21 JAN 1864 d: 1 AUG 1926
Oliver Louis Zangwill b: 29 OCT 1913 d: 12 OCT 1987
Joy Moult b: 1924 d: 2016
David Ayrton Zangwill b: FEB 1952 d: 1953
Ayrton Israel Zangwill b: 15 AUG 1906
James Edward Nugent b: 3 JAN 1833
Margaret Louisa Nugent d: JUL 1905
Philip O'Reilly d: 24 SEP 1912
Edward Nugent Ayrton b: 13 MAR 1815 d: 28 NOV 1873
William Edward Ayrton , F.R.S. F.R.S. b: 14 SEP 1847 d: 6 NOV 1908
Matilda Charlotte Chaplin , M.D. b: 20 JUN 1846 d: 19 JUL 1883
Edith Chaplin Ayrton b: 1 OCT 1874 d: 5 MAY 1945
Israel Zangwill b: 21 JAN 1864 d: 1 AUG 1926
Oliver Louis Zangwill b: 29 OCT 1913 d: 12 OCT 1987
Joy Moult b: 1924 d: 2016
David Ayrton Zangwill b: FEB 1952 d: 1953
Ayrton Israel Zangwill b: 15 AUG 1906
Phoebe Sarah (Hertha) Marks b: 28 APR 1854 d: 26 AUG 1923
Barbara Bodichon Ayrton b: 3 APR 1886 d: OCT 1950
Gerald Gould b: 1885 d: 1936
Michael Ayrton b: 20 FEB 1921 d: 17 NOV 1975
Frederick Ayrton b: 20 MAR 1812 d: 20 JUN 1873
Margaret Hicks b: 1808 d: 12 SEP 1873
Agnes Nugent Ayrton b: 31 MAY 1834 d: 24 APR 1907
Charles Cyril Hicks , Dr b: 1832 d: ABT OCT 1894
Frederick Ayrton b: 1836
Acton Smee Ayrton b: 5 AUG 1816 d: 30 NOV 1886
John Hyde Ayrton b: 4 JAN 1818 d: 1845