Mary Ann Watkyns

Mary Ann Watkyns

b:
d: 1860
21 Burton Crescent (Cartwright Gardens)
Bloomsbury
London
From 'The James, Pyne, Dixon Family Book', publ 1977: reminiscenses of Edith Elizabeth Chaplin

"My Grandmama James lived till I was over fifteen years of age. She had a strong memory and a very lively wit. She was born and brought up in London, where she spent her life. She was a great reader and a very good talker. She enjoyed and appreciated Darwin's Origin of Species when it first came out. I remember her pointing to the book and saying how remarkable it was and that it would have far reaching consequences, or words to that effect. We never knew any of Grandmama's relations, from which I gather she was of humble birth. She was one of twins and had been adopted by her Mother's sister, when twenty months old, and never seems to have had any intercourse with her own family, except with an elder brother, also adopted by the Aunt. He seems to have been stupid and disappeared early from Grandmama's life; whether he died or went under I don't know.

The Aunt who adopted Grandmama was married to a Mr. Andrew Winpany, [WINPENNY is correct spelling and will be used here. ACP] a stock-broker who lived in Sloane Street. Grandmama told me of the beautiful peaches which grew in the garden there. Her Uncle, Mr. Winpenny, was fond of Grandmama and sent her to a good day school kept by the Misses Babington, the sisters of a Dr. Babington, an eminent physician of that day. When Grandmama married, her Uncle Winpenny gave her a Stock Exchange Share of the then value of £100. This share was always kept by my Grandmother as her private property. I believe it was an original share, taken by Andrew Winpenny when the Stock Exchange was built. This share was held by my Grandmama for about fifty years and when she died she gave it to her eldest daughter, Aunt Maryanne. The share, however, became increasingly valuable and realized between £2,000 and £3,000 when sold. (This may have been in the 'seventies'.) Feeling for the claims of family upon property was very strong a century ago. Fond as he was of my Grandmother, Mr. Winpenny left his money to members of his own family, letting Grandmama go empty-handed to her husband save for the Stock Exchange share, which was then only worth £100.

On the other hand, when Mr.James proposed to his penniless niece, he refused to allow the marriage, unless the whole of Mr.James's property was settled upon her - a most unreasonable demand. My Mother who told me the incident related how the young people came to a private agreement; the money was settled to satisfy Mr. Winpenny, but in such a way that my Grandmother was to repudiate the settlement after her marriage, an agreement she honourably carried out. She used later to describe how the Judge before whom she made her declaration addressed her in awe-inspiring and sepulchral tones:- 'DO YOU KNOW, YOUNG WOMAN, WHAT YOU ARE DOING?'.

Grandmama, whose maiden name was Mary Ann Watkins (sic), used to say she was of Welsh origin, and her name Watkin (sic) bore out this idea, though as a child, she was generally called 'little Winpenny'. She was very good company, having a fund of good stories and a terse way of putting them. (She remembered the days of the French Revolution and in particular finding her Aunt crying at the news of the death of the 'Dolphin' - the name by which she called the poor little Dauphin.) She was a clever woman, quick both in temper and understanding, strong in her affections, extremely generous; and I think she was the most wilful woman of my acquaintance. For twenty years or so before her death, Grandmama James was afflicted with a very distressing cough. I remember her always confined to the house and screened from every draught, as any change of temperature might bring on a paroxysm of coughing in which she seemed to be about to suffocate. So sensitive had she become that if I had got wet during a walk to Mudies to fetch her books, I was not allowed to go into her room to take them to her in my wet clothing for fear of giving her cold.

She had married about the year 1809, when she must have been an attractive woman with a considerable share of good looks and the brilliant complexion so much admired at that date. Her portrait as an old lady was in the possession of her granddaughter, Helen Sophia Graham, whose son inherited it.
Biography
21 Burton Crescent (Cartwright Gardens)
Bloomsbury
London From 'The James, Pyne, Dixon Family Book', publ 1977: reminiscenses of Edith Elizabeth Chaplin

"My Grandmama James lived till I was over fifteen years of age. She had a strong memory and a very lively wit. She was born and brought up in London, where she spent her life. She was a great reader and a very good talker. She enjoyed and appreciated Darwin's Origin of Species when it first came out. I remember her pointing to the book and saying how remarkable it was and that it would have far reaching consequences, or words to that effect. We never knew any of Grandmama's relations, from which I gather she was of humble birth. She was one of twins and had been adopted by her Mother's sister, when twenty months old, and never seems to have had any intercourse with her own family, except with an elder brother, also adopted by the Aunt. He seems to have been stupid and disappeared early from Grandmama's life; whether he died or went under I don't know.

The Aunt who adopted Grandmama was married to a Mr. Andrew Winpany, [WINPENNY is correct spelling and will be used here. ACP] a stock-broker who lived in Sloane Street. Grandmama told me of the beautiful peaches which grew in the garden there. Her Uncle, Mr. Winpenny, was fond of Grandmama and sent her to a good day school kept by the Misses Babington, the sisters of a Dr. Babington, an eminent physician of that day. When Grandmama married, her Uncle Winpenny gave her a Stock Exchange Share of the then value of £100. This share was always kept by my Grandmother as her private property. I believe it was an original share, taken by Andrew Winpenny when the Stock Exchange was built. This share was held by my Grandmama for about fifty years and when she died she gave it to her eldest daughter, Aunt Maryanne. The share, however, became increasingly valuable and realized between £2,000 and £3,000 when sold. (This may have been in the 'seventies'.) Feeling for the claims of family upon property was very strong a century ago. Fond as he was of my Grandmother, Mr. Winpenny left his money to members of his own family, letting Grandmama go empty-handed to her husband save for the Stock Exchange share, which was then only worth £100.

On the other hand, when Mr.James proposed to his penniless niece, he refused to allow the marriage, unless the whole of Mr.James's property was settled upon her - a most unreasonable demand. My Mother who told me the incident related how the young people came to a private agreement; the money was settled to satisfy Mr. Winpenny, but in such a way that my Grandmother was to repudiate the settlement after her marriage, an agreement she honourably carried out. She used later to describe how the Judge before whom she made her declaration addressed her in awe-inspiring and sepulchral tones:- 'DO YOU KNOW, YOUNG WOMAN, WHAT YOU ARE DOING?'.

Grandmama, whose maiden name was Mary Ann Watkins (sic), used to say she was of Welsh origin, and her name Watkin (sic) bore out this idea, though as a child, she was generally called 'little Winpenny'. She was very good company, having a fund of good stories and a terse way of putting them. (She remembered the days of the French Revolution and in particular finding her Aunt crying at the news of the death of the 'Dolphin' - the name by which she called the poor little Dauphin.) She was a clever woman, quick both in temper and understanding, strong in her affections, extremely generous; and I think she was the most wilful woman of my acquaintance. For twenty years or so before her death, Grandmama James was afflicted with a very distressing cough. I remember her always confined to the house and screened from every draught, as any change of temperature might bring on a paroxysm of coughing in which she seemed to be about to suffocate. So sensitive had she become that if I had got wet during a walk to Mudies to fetch her books, I was not allowed to go into her room to take them to her in my wet clothing for fear of giving her cold.

She had married about the year 1809, when she must have been an attractive woman with a considerable share of good looks and the brilliant complexion so much admired at that date. Her portrait as an old lady was in the possession of her granddaughter, Helen Sophia Graham, whose son inherited it.
Facts
  • 1860 - Death -
  • 1829 - Fact -
Ancestors
   
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Family Group Sheet - Child
PARENT (M) Samuel Watkyns
Birth
Death
Marriageto ?
Father?
Mother?
PARENT (U) ?
Birth
Death
Father?
Mother?
CHILDREN
FMary Ann Watkyns
Birth
Death1860
Marriage1809to Thomas James
Family Group Sheet - Spouse
PARENT (M) Thomas James
Birth1780
Death1853 Bloomsbury, London. Buried at Highgate
Marriage1809to Mary Ann Watkyns
FatherThomas James , Dr
MotherElizabeth Mander
PARENT (F) Mary Ann Watkyns
Birth
Death1860
Marriage1809to Thomas James
FatherSamuel Watkyns
Mother?
CHILDREN
FHarriet James
Birth25 DEC 1819
Death13 MAR 1895Eastbourne, buried at Woodchester, Gloucestershire
Marriage7 APR 1840to Henry Pyne at Old Church, St Pancras, London, England
FMary Anne James
Birth1810
Death1884
MThomas Andrew James
Birth1812
Death1841Burried at Hillingdon, Middlesex
FElizabeth Maria James
Birth1814
DeathJAN 1885
Marriage1835to John Bond Dixon at St Pancras
Evidence
[S3841] The James, Pyne, Dixon Family Book, compiled by Alicia C Percival, publ London 1977
Descendancy Chart
Mary Ann Watkyns d: 1860
Thomas James b: 1780 d: 1853
Harriet James b: 25 DEC 1819 d: 13 MAR 1895
Henry Pyne b: 2 JAN 1809 d: 9 FEB 1885
Edith Elizabeth Pyne b: 28 SEP 1845 d: 1928
Ayrton Chaplin , Rev b: 19 OCT 1842 d: 1930
Ursula (Ulla) Chaplin , M.D. b: 30 NOV 1869 d: 1937
Adriana (Audrey) Chaplin b: 26 APR 1872 d: 15 DEC 1945
Ursula Joan Gregory b: 29 JUL 1896 d: 17 JUL 1959
Christopher John (Kit) Gregory b: 11 JUL 1900 d: 1977
Marion Eastty Black b: 3 MAY 1902 d: AUG 1998
Elizabeth Gregory b: 22 OCT 1933 d: 1938
Henry Ayrton Chaplin , L.R.C.P. & S. b: 21 AUG 1876 d: 2 JUL 1905
Mary Juliana Pyne b: 17 FEB 1841 d: 1927
Alice Pyne b: 21 OCT 1843 d: 1917
John Granville Grenfell b: 1839 d: 1937
Bernard Pyne Grenfell b: 16 DEC 1869 d: 1925
Edward Lionel Grenfell b: 9 MAY 1873 d: 20 SEP 1874
Helen Sophia Pyne b: 27 MAY 1844 d: 1931
Edward Frederick Grenfell b: 1841 d: 29 DEC 1870
Arthur Pascoe Grenfell b: 24 APR 1868 d: 25 NOV 1932
Harold Granville Grenfell b: DEC 1869 d: 29 FEB 1948
Allen Dowdeswell Graham b: 1837 d: 10 JUL 1905
Irene Marguerite Graham b: AUG 1881 d: JUL 1897
George Roland Graham b: 17 APR 1884 d: 17 MAR 1905
Helen Muriel Graham b: JUN 1880 d: 1916
Harriet Pyne b: 22 AUG 1847 d: 1929
Frederick Henvey , I.C.S b: 1842 d: 1913
Margaret Henvey , O B E b: 1868 d: 1946
Mary Isobel (Molly) Ramsay b: 29 JAN 1894 d: 1970
Victor Wellesley Roche , Col b: 1889 d: 1970
William Henvey b: 21 JUN 1867 d: 11 JAN 1904
Mary Duffield d: 1897
Frederick Charles Henvey b: 7 AUG 1870 d: 10 DEC 1891
Isabel Henvey b: 19 AUG 1872 d: 1925
Katherine Mary Henvey b: 19 MAR 1873 d: 1960
Ralph Henvey , Col b: 3 JAN 1875 d: 1945
Constance Pyne b: 2 APR 1851 d: 1929
Jervoise Athelstane Baines , K.C.S.I. K.C.S.I b: 17 OCT 1847 d: 26 NOV 1925
Sylvia Baines b: 29 SEP 1875 d: 14 JUL 1941
Philip Edward Percival , ICS b: 11 NOV 1872 d: 1939
Alicia Constance Percival b: 13 MAY 1903
David Athelstane Percival b: 29 MAY 1906
Cuthbert Edward Baines b: 12 JUN 1879 d: 1959
Margaret Clemency Lane Poole b: 6 APR 1886 d: 1945
Elizabeth Eularia Baines b: 4 MAY 1914 d: 1970
Cyril Clarke d: 1975
Mary Anne James b: 1810 d: 1884
Thomas Andrew James b: 1812 d: 1841
Elizabeth Maria James b: 1814 d: JAN 1885
John Bond Dixon b: 1811 d: 1852
Ada Dixon b: 31 JAN 1837
Laura Jane Dixon b: 2 DEC 1839
Agnes Mary Catherine Dixon b: 13 MAR 1834 d: 1853
Herminah Elizabeth Dixon d: 1 AUG 1910
John James Dixon b: 19 NOV 1840 d: 27 SEP 1915
Hannah Elizabeth West b: 1843 d: ABT 1930