Agnes Nugent Ayrton

Agnes Nugent Ayrton

b: 31 MAY 1834
d: 24 APR 1907
Additional information in manuscript in Ann Mendell's copy of the "Chaplin and Skinner Families" book:

Mr Frank Hicks told me (Agnes Nugent Hicks) I need not trouble about proofs, because he recollected his father (my mother's Uncle Sam) from his childhood constantly talking of his Great Grandfather, the nonjuring bishop. Some evidence lies in alternate eldest sons being George and Robert; also that several from bishop downwards died of stone (Mr Frank Hicks, I believe; he was operated on successfully in 1882 and lived a few years on; Uncle Sam died of it and I think the Vicar of Potton; both Mr F Hicks and his father lived to near 90). Robert Hicks, Vicar of Potton (see back of Pedigree C), like his nonjuring father had the courage of his opinions, for he forfeited the living of Gamblingaye for allowing Wesley to preach from its pulpit. Bishop Hicks, author of the well known "Hicks Devotions" was very learned; he was not banished, but kept secretly in London in the service of the Government (as I have heard) translating. MY theory is that Potton living was given to his son, stipulating that he should drop the 'e' in Hickes. I have spent hours looking over the Potton registers, where he always signs 'Hicks' in a most perfect handwriting. His grandson Charles, physician in Bath, took back the 'e' to distinguish himself from a tradesman in Bath.


From Matilda Adriana Chaplin's diary for July 1873:

Tuesday 22

Went to Dunstable to see Agnes, found her looking ill and in bed. Baby Freddie a healthy child, well-developed in body and in mind, unusually intelligent, altogether a very charming child.

Wednesday 23

Dunstable a nice healthy Place, the garden very pretty in its flowery luxurious, the Irish yews along the border of the lawn very pretty. The house has a friendly homely aspect - perhaps with doctors as with parsons the master is of the household - not in at certain stated times -- this breaks all form - and the necessary irregularity at the doctors at once waives off all ceremony.

Thursday 24

Returned to London. Sorry to leave Agnes and dear child -- well-trained children are the angels of this world. Found various letters from Julia.


Allan Chaplin wrote from Ootacamund, 2 November 1894:
Poor Charles Hicks, I am very glad he did not suffer much pain at the last. I knew but little of him -- but liked him -- a clever man - a simple manner and amiable disposition. I suppose Agnes will now be more than ever a "femme d'affaires" in her own peculiar away. She is indeed fortunate in having the support and companionship of such a son!


[Letter from Agnes N. Ayrton to Holroyd Chaplin, no year given, but could be 15 June 1870 since that was the year of Holroyd's marriage.]

Near Como, June 15th

Dear Holroyd

I send you the lines you asked for some weeks ago. If I recalled rightly you had a little trouble about the meter in the first two lines of the second part. It has just occurred to me, would not the introduction of "his" (italicized) fit "the" before "deathbed," effect all that is wanting, ie it would accentuate naturally a syllable Nicholliewise as "the" sounds better forced accentuated when followed by such a word as deathbed. Now, with his deathbed. There is something (?) in accentuating his more than the syllable death that follows.

Will you tell me what is the original painting from which this photograph is taken? There is a very lovely fresco in the Brera(?) Gallery at Milan by Bernardino Luinci(?) of the Body of St Catherine carried by three angels to the sepulchre which I should imagine very probably suggested that of which theme the photograph and which it resembles; of the fresco Murray says "a lovely work, reproduced in chromo-lithography by our Arundel Society of London." Perhaps you know it, but it would not fit your nurses(?) as the other does.

June 13th

I want to know if your wedding is fixed for this autumn and if so when? I am sorry to be delayed finishing this but hope it does not matter. I will not delay it longer by (?) now but refer you to my letter to Aunt M. I must (?)impress the necessity of an immediate reply as it is by the (?) these rooms are held open for me.

Be sure you give my love to Effie when you write and with mine to yourself,

Believe me your affectionate cousin

Agnes N. Ayrton.

If Julia wishes to consult anybody about the likelihood of (?) suiting her she had letter go to (?) Weber, 10 (?) Street, Grosvenor Sq

[Overleaf, Holroyd’s poems:]

Where we shall close our eyes and die,
May we be attended by
Faith & Hope & Charity;
May an angel from above
Gently guide those trials of love,
Late we in their upward flight
All the meaner things of earth!
See we with a keener sight
Everything of heavenly worth!

But alas! for the deathbed
Alas, the troubled night,
Whence the three have mourning fled,
Scared by our affright!
Where faith has prayed for years in pain
And hope has hoped for years in vain,
Where charity has fought with scorn
From morn to eve. from eve to morn;
There mercy sheathes her guardian sword
And sheds a sad angelic tear,
She turns, does homage to her Lord,
And leaves the wretch to die in fear.

6th April 1862 H.C.
Biography
Additional information in manuscript in Ann Mendell's copy of the "Chaplin and Skinner Families" book:

Mr Frank Hicks told me (Agnes Nugent Hicks) I need not trouble about proofs, because he recollected his father (my mother's Uncle Sam) from his childhood constantly talking of his Great Grandfather, the nonjuring bishop. Some evidence lies in alternate eldest sons being George and Robert; also that several from bishop downwards died of stone (Mr Frank Hicks, I believe; he was operated on successfully in 1882 and lived a few years on; Uncle Sam died of it and I think the Vicar of Potton; both Mr F Hicks and his father lived to near 90). Robert Hicks, Vicar of Potton (see back of Pedigree C), like his nonjuring father had the courage of his opinions, for he forfeited the living of Gamblingaye for allowing Wesley to preach from its pulpit. Bishop Hicks, author of the well known "Hicks Devotions" was very learned; he was not banished, but kept secretly in London in the service of the Government (as I have heard) translating. MY theory is that Potton living was given to his son, stipulating that he should drop the 'e' in Hickes. I have spent hours looking over the Potton registers, where he always signs 'Hicks' in a most perfect handwriting. His grandson Charles, physician in Bath, took back the 'e' to distinguish himself from a tradesman in Bath.


From Matilda Adriana Chaplin's diary for July 1873:

Tuesday 22

Went to Dunstable to see Agnes, found her looking ill and in bed. Baby Freddie a healthy child, well-developed in body and in mind, unusually intelligent, altogether a very charming child.

Wednesday 23

Dunstable a nice healthy Place, the garden very pretty in its flowery luxurious, the Irish yews along the border of the lawn very pretty. The house has a friendly homely aspect - perhaps with doctors as with parsons the master is of the household - not in at certain stated times -- this breaks all form - and the necessary irregularity at the doctors at once waives off all ceremony.

Thursday 24

Returned to London. Sorry to leave Agnes and dear child -- well-trained children are the angels of this world. Found various letters from Julia.


Allan Chaplin wrote from Ootacamund, 2 November 1894:
Poor Charles Hicks, I am very glad he did not suffer much pain at the last. I knew but little of him -- but liked him -- a clever man - a simple manner and amiable disposition. I suppose Agnes will now be more than ever a "femme d'affaires" in her own peculiar away. She is indeed fortunate in having the support and companionship of such a son!


[Letter from Agnes N. Ayrton to Holroyd Chaplin, no year given, but could be 15 June 1870 since that was the year of Holroyd's marriage.]

Near Como, June 15th

Dear Holroyd

I send you the lines you asked for some weeks ago. If I recalled rightly you had a little trouble about the meter in the first two lines of the second part. It has just occurred to me, would not the introduction of "his" (italicized) fit "the" before "deathbed," effect all that is wanting, ie it would accentuate naturally a syllable Nicholliewise as "the" sounds better forced accentuated when followed by such a word as deathbed. Now, with his deathbed. There is something (?) in accentuating his more than the syllable death that follows.

Will you tell me what is the original painting from which this photograph is taken? There is a very lovely fresco in the Brera(?) Gallery at Milan by Bernardino Luinci(?) of the Body of St Catherine carried by three angels to the sepulchre which I should imagine very probably suggested that of which theme the photograph and which it resembles; of the fresco Murray says "a lovely work, reproduced in chromo-lithography by our Arundel Society of London." Perhaps you know it, but it would not fit your nurses(?) as the other does.

June 13th

I want to know if your wedding is fixed for this autumn and if so when? I am sorry to be delayed finishing this but hope it does not matter. I will not delay it longer by (?) now but refer you to my letter to Aunt M. I must (?)impress the necessity of an immediate reply as it is by the (?) these rooms are held open for me.

Be sure you give my love to Effie when you write and with mine to yourself,

Believe me your affectionate cousin

Agnes N. Ayrton.

If Julia wishes to consult anybody about the likelihood of (?) suiting her she had letter go to (?) Weber, 10 (?) Street, Grosvenor Sq

[Overleaf, Holroyd’s poems:]

Where we shall close our eyes and die,
May we be attended by
Faith & Hope & Charity;
May an angel from above
Gently guide those trials of love,
Late we in their upward flight
All the meaner things of earth!
See we with a keener sight
Everything of heavenly worth!

But alas! for the deathbed
Alas, the troubled night,
Whence the three have mourning fled,
Scared by our affright!
Where faith has prayed for years in pain
And hope has hoped for years in vain,
Where charity has fought with scorn
From morn to eve. from eve to morn;
There mercy sheathes her guardian sword
And sheds a sad angelic tear,
She turns, does homage to her Lord,
And leaves the wretch to die in fear.

6th April 1862 H.C.
Facts
  • 31 MAY 1834 - Birth -
  • 24 APR 1907 - Death -
Ancestors
   
Frederick Ayrton
1780 - 24 NOV 1824
 
 
Frederick Ayrton
20 MAR 1812 - 20 JUN 1873
  
  
  
 
Agnes Nugent Ayrton
31 MAY 1834 - 24 APR 1907
  
 
  
 
 
Margaret Hicks
1808 - 12 SEP 1873
  
  
  
Ann
-
 
Family Group Sheet - Child
PARENT (M) Frederick Ayrton
Birth20 MAR 1812Chelsea, London
Death20 JUN 1873 Arundel Gardens, London
Marriage13 AUG 1833to Margaret Hicks at St Paul's, Walden, Hertfordshire. Witnesses were J C Chaplin and his two sisters, M A Ayrton and her brother Edward Nuge
FatherFrederick Ayrton
MotherJuliana Caroline Rebecca Adriana Nugent
PARENT (F) Margaret Hicks
Birth1808Christened 8 January 1808 in Baldock, Hertfordshire, England
Death12 SEP 1873 Margate
Marriage13 AUG 1833to Frederick Ayrton at St Paul's, Walden, Hertfordshire. Witnesses were J C Chaplin and his two sisters, M A Ayrton and her brother Edward Nuge
FatherGeorge Hicks
MotherAnn
CHILDREN
FAgnes Nugent Ayrton
Birth31 MAY 1834
Death24 APR 1907
Marriage29 APR 1871to Charles Cyril Hicks , Dr
MFrederick Ayrton
Birth1836
Death
Marriageto French woman
Family Group Sheet - Spouse
PARENT (M) Charles Cyril Hicks , Dr
Birth1832
DeathABT OCT 1894
Marriage29 APR 1871to Agnes Nugent Ayrton
FatherRobert Denby Hicks
MotherBrazier
PARENT (F) Agnes Nugent Ayrton
Birth31 MAY 1834
Death24 APR 1907
Marriage29 APR 1871to Charles Cyril Hicks , Dr
FatherFrederick Ayrton
MotherMargaret Hicks
CHILDREN
MFrederick Cyril Nugent Hicks , Rt Rev
Birth28 JUN 1872Dunstable
Death
Marriage29 JUN 1904to Kathleen Savage at Keeble College Chapel. Married by Wigram? - Warden of Keeble and Dean of Manchester
Evidence
[S12758] Ann Gregory (Mendell)'s copy of 'A short account of the Families of Chaplin and Skinner........' with annotations by Ayrton Chaplin & others
Descendancy Chart
Agnes Nugent Ayrton b: 31 MAY 1834 d: 24 APR 1907
Charles Cyril Hicks , Dr b: 1832 d: ABT OCT 1894