Adriana Spencer

Adriana Spencer

b:
d: 6 AUG 1839
From 'The Chaplin and Skinner Families' page 49 :

Mrs. Adriana Nugent survived her husband, Colonel Nugent, by a few years, and died on the 6th August, 1839. Her granddaughter, Mrs. M. A. Chaplin, in her 'Memoir' frequently refers to her, eg:

"We all dined at my grandfather's. I was dressed in a silk dress colour eau de nil, which I did not think very pretty, but was consoled with a pink sash to be worn with it. Eau de nil was called the fashionable colour; I bore this in mind in case my schoolfellows should find fault with it. But I did not have to wait for their disapproval. My grandmother: "What an unbecoming dress!" But worse than that, it was painfully tight in the waist. I bore it through dinner, then slipped away to find the servant to pin it in some way; in fact, the grand French dress was rather a failure. The façon, too, was to English eyes peculiar; so was my walking-out toilet, but I do not remember what it was. Then came the Christmas holidays and Christmas parties. The best party we went to was at a Mr. Ottley's on Twelfth Night. There might have been about 100 there, of various ages. I.well remember seeing Sir Thomas Lawrence as he was talking to my mother, and asked her, pointing to Edward, if she knew who that boy was. "He has a fine head." I had always thought his head was like some statue I had seen.

These Ottleys were a West Indian family. We used to hear them pitied for having lost so much by the abolition of slavery in the West Indies, but as they lived in a nice house in the Regent's Park, kept one or two men servants (black), and about three or four females, I wondered why my grandfather called him "poor Ottley." It was explained to me how they had formerly kept horses, carriages, and many niggers. We knew about five West Indian families, and I enjoyed spending the day at their houses. They were nice, kind people, and spoke pleasantly to their servants, though I saw Mrs. Ottley box the young nurse's ears for being very lazy, as she certainly was. I saw her often sitting on the floor enjoying her dolce par niente, looking so happy, staring at us and listening to us in a vacant way. Then there was another West India household, the females (mother and her sister) were almost black; they were not visited. There were two daughters who were not so dark; one of them sang beautifully. It was allowed to go and see them, and I very much enjoyed seeing the, to me, novel interior. The peculiar talk and accent of the mamma and aunt, their queer dresses, a sort of striped calico, loose jacket, and coloured cotton handkerchief like a turban on their heads. They gave me cakes. There was always a smell of cooking in that house. The young ladies were always well dressed. My grandmother was good-natured and noticed them, but I never met them at any other West Indian house. The other families, I believe, were quite white and highly educated. Altogether I rather preferred the West to the East Indian friends or acquaintances. They did not criticise me, and made me feel more at home with them. My grandmother approved of slavery on Biblical authority, would not believe they were ever treated cruelly, though she must have known they were as a fact. I heard of Mr. Someone, who put his slave down a well. Ottley had a fine collection of pictures. His brother wrote the History of Engraving. Our friends were remarkably musical."

And, after her father's death:

"It did not seem strange to me then that my grandmother was not the consoler of her only daughter, but I heard years after that she never was fondly attached to her. My grandmother was a pleasant, lively little woman; my mother was more serious and earnest, like her father, and was more his companion than was her mother. She did not take the deep interest in the children that he did. She was very fond of Edward, however, and was generally kind to us."
Biography
From 'The Chaplin and Skinner Families' page 49 :

Mrs. Adriana Nugent survived her husband, Colonel Nugent, by a few years, and died on the 6th August, 1839. Her granddaughter, Mrs. M. A. Chaplin, in her 'Memoir' frequently refers to her, eg:

"We all dined at my grandfather's. I was dressed in a silk dress colour eau de nil, which I did not think very pretty, but was consoled with a pink sash to be worn with it. Eau de nil was called the fashionable colour; I bore this in mind in case my schoolfellows should find fault with it. But I did not have to wait for their disapproval. My grandmother: "What an unbecoming dress!" But worse than that, it was painfully tight in the waist. I bore it through dinner, then slipped away to find the servant to pin it in some way; in fact, the grand French dress was rather a failure. The façon, too, was to English eyes peculiar; so was my walking-out toilet, but I do not remember what it was. Then came the Christmas holidays and Christmas parties. The best party we went to was at a Mr. Ottley's on Twelfth Night. There might have been about 100 there, of various ages. I.well remember seeing Sir Thomas Lawrence as he was talking to my mother, and asked her, pointing to Edward, if she knew who that boy was. "He has a fine head." I had always thought his head was like some statue I had seen.

These Ottleys were a West Indian family. We used to hear them pitied for having lost so much by the abolition of slavery in the West Indies, but as they lived in a nice house in the Regent's Park, kept one or two men servants (black), and about three or four females, I wondered why my grandfather called him "poor Ottley." It was explained to me how they had formerly kept horses, carriages, and many niggers. We knew about five West Indian families, and I enjoyed spending the day at their houses. They were nice, kind people, and spoke pleasantly to their servants, though I saw Mrs. Ottley box the young nurse's ears for being very lazy, as she certainly was. I saw her often sitting on the floor enjoying her dolce par niente, looking so happy, staring at us and listening to us in a vacant way. Then there was another West India household, the females (mother and her sister) were almost black; they were not visited. There were two daughters who were not so dark; one of them sang beautifully. It was allowed to go and see them, and I very much enjoyed seeing the, to me, novel interior. The peculiar talk and accent of the mamma and aunt, their queer dresses, a sort of striped calico, loose jacket, and coloured cotton handkerchief like a turban on their heads. They gave me cakes. There was always a smell of cooking in that house. The young ladies were always well dressed. My grandmother was good-natured and noticed them, but I never met them at any other West Indian house. The other families, I believe, were quite white and highly educated. Altogether I rather preferred the West to the East Indian friends or acquaintances. They did not criticise me, and made me feel more at home with them. My grandmother approved of slavery on Biblical authority, would not believe they were ever treated cruelly, though she must have known they were as a fact. I heard of Mr. Someone, who put his slave down a well. Ottley had a fine collection of pictures. His brother wrote the History of Engraving. Our friends were remarkably musical."

And, after her father's death:

"It did not seem strange to me then that my grandmother was not the consoler of her only daughter, but I heard years after that she never was fondly attached to her. My grandmother was a pleasant, lively little woman; my mother was more serious and earnest, like her father, and was more his companion than was her mother. She did not take the deep interest in the children that he did. She was very fond of Edward, however, and was generally kind to us."
Facts
  • 6 AUG 1839 - Death -
Ancestors
   
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Adriana Spencer
- 6 AUG 1839
  
 
  
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Family Group Sheet - Child
PARENT (M) John Spencer
Birth
Death
Marriageto ?
Father?
Mother?
PARENT (U) ?
Birth
Death
Father?
Mother?
CHILDREN
FAdriana Spencer
Birth
Death6 AUG 1839
MarriageABT 1787to Edward Nugent , Col.
Marriageto ?
Family Group Sheet - Spouse
PARENT (M) Edward Nugent , Col.
Birth24 JUL 1755
Death23 MAR 1836
MarriageABT 1787to Adriana Spencer
FatherWalter Nugent
MotherRebecca Woodward
PARENT (F) Adriana Spencer
Birth
Death6 AUG 1839
MarriageABT 1787to Edward Nugent , Col.
Marriageto ?
FatherJohn Spencer
Mother?
CHILDREN
FJuliana Caroline Rebecca Adriana Nugent
BirthAFT 1787
Death10 MAR 1833
Marriage1 JUN 1811to Frederick Ayrton at St. Lukes Church, Chelsea, London
MJames Nugent
Birth1792
Death25 JAN 1815
Family Group Sheet - Spouse
PARENT (M) ?
Birth
Death
Marriageto Adriana Spencer
Father?
Mother?
PARENT (F) Adriana Spencer
Birth
Death6 AUG 1839
MarriageABT 1787to Edward Nugent , Col.
Marriageto ?
FatherJohn Spencer
Mother?
CHILDREN
FPeggy ?
Birth
DeathABT 1820caught severe cold by going to Vauxhall in thin shoes, the same night ruptured a vessel in a fit of coughing, and died i
Marriageto John Smee
Descendancy Chart
Adriana Spencer d: 6 AUG 1839
Edward Nugent , Col. b: 24 JUL 1755 d: 23 MAR 1836
Juliana Caroline Rebecca Adriana Nugent b: AFT 1787 d: 10 MAR 1833
Frederick Ayrton b: 1780 d: 24 NOV 1824
Matilda Adriana Ayrton b: 1 JUN 1813 d: 26 JAN 1899
John Clarke Chaplin b: 25 AUG 1806 d: 2 JUN 1856
Holroyd Chaplin b: 17 MAR 1840 d: 23 DEC 1917
Euphemia Isabella Skinner b: 7 JUN 1847 d: 10 SEP 1939
Irene Kate Chaplin b: 1 MAR 1873 d: 22 JUN 1962
John William Ernest Pearce b: 4 APR 1864 d: 25 JAN 1951
Edward Holroyd Pearce , Lord b: 9 FEB 1901 d: 27 NOV 1990
Erica Priestman b: 1906 d: DEC 1985
Richard Bruce Holroyd Pearce b: 12 MAY 1930 d: 1987
James Edward Holroyd Pearce b: 18 MAR 1934 d: 11 JUN 1985
Phyllis Margaret Pearce b: 8 FEB 1910 d: 6 JUN 1973
Edward Douglas Eade b: 7 FEB 1911 d: 24 DEC 1984
John Allan Chaplin Pearce b: 21 OCT 1912 d: 15 SEP 2006
Helen Nugent Pearce b: 22 NOV 1917 d: 6 APR 1920
Effie Irene Pearce b: 18 AUG 1899 d: 26 JAN 1996
Raymond Ray-Jones R.E., A.R.C.A. b: 31 AUG 1886 d: 26 FEB 1942
Holroyd Anthony Ray-Jones b: 7 JUN 1941 d: 13 MAR 1972
Allan Nugent Chaplin b: 8 JUN 1871 d: 1917
Son Chaplin b: 29 NOV 1900 d: ABT 29 NOV 1900
Matilda Effie Chaplin b: 20 JUN 1874 d: 20 DEC 1874
Phyllis Chaplin b: 7 JUN 1879 d: 27 JUL 1924
Philip Herbert Cowell b: 1870 d: 1949
Theodoric Chaplin b: 14 FEB 1881 d: 29 OCT 1906
Daphne Grace Chaplin b: 6 SEP 1884 d: 16 FEB 1964
Daphne Grace Chaplin b: 6 SEP 1884 d: 16 FEB 1964
Cecil Arbuthnot Gould b: 1883 d: 1917
Allan Chaplin , Col b: 20 JUN 1844 d: 19 AUG 1910
Maud Elizabeth Skinner b: 25 OCT 1844 d: 24 JUN 1904
Wyndham Allan Chaplin , Mus. Bac. Oxon., Rev b: 12 NOV 1872 d: 29 AUG 1914
Mabel Florance Ida Chaplin b: 7 OCT 1875 d: 1970
Charles Nugent Hope-Wallace b: 3 FEB 1877 d: 15 OCT 1953
Philip Hope-Wallace b: NOV 1911 d: 1979
Nina Mary Hope-Wallace b: 14 DEC 1905 d: 1995
Edward O'Bryen Hoare , Sir b: 29 APR 1898 d: 1969
Maud Dorothea Fanny Chaplin b: 23 JUL 1880 d: 6 NOV 1899
Louisa Sarah Chaplin b: 23 APR 1838 d: 9 JUL 1897
John Edwin Hilary Skinner b: 11 JAN 1839 d: 20 NOV 1894
John Allan Cleveland Skinner b: 19 SEP 1865 d: 8 SEP 1925
Hilary Francis Cleveland Skinner b: 10 OCT 1889 d: 25 JUL 1916
John Adrian Dudley Skinner b: 2 SEP 1891 d: 30 MAY 1965
Bruce Allan Maclean Skinner b: 29 AUG 1927 d: 2002
Caroline Louisa Marianne Skinner b: 22 FEB 1873 d: 20 JUN 1936
Roandeu Albert Henry Bickford-Smith b: 3 MAY 1859 d: 13 DEC 1916
William Nugent Venning Bickford-Smith b: 14 MAY 1892 d: 3 SEP 1975
Amy Evelyn Holme b: 6 SEP 1906 d: 21 JUL 1979
Leslie Evelyn Bickford-Smith b: 1928 d: 1990
Leonard James Jacob b: 1928 d: 1989
John Allan Bickford-Smith Capt RN b: 23 APR 1895 d: 8 MAY 1970
Joan Angel Allsebrook Simon b: 8 AUG 1901 d: 13 APR 1991
Norman Kennedy d: 1926
Aubrey Louis Bickford-Smith b: 4 FEB 1902 d: 9 JUL 1975
Roger Bickford-Smith b: 1939 d: 1997
Clifton Wyndham Hilary Skinner , R.F.A. b: 26 MAR 1880 d: 17 FEB 1908
Ayrton Chaplin , Rev b: 19 OCT 1842 d: 1930
Edith Elizabeth Pyne b: 28 SEP 1845 d: 1928
Ursula (Ulla) Chaplin , M.D. b: 30 NOV 1869 d: 1937
Adriana (Audrey) Chaplin b: 26 APR 1872 d: 15 DEC 1945
Ursula Joan Gregory b: 29 JUL 1896 d: 17 JUL 1959
Christopher John (Kit) Gregory b: 11 JUL 1900 d: 1977
Marion Eastty Black b: 3 MAY 1902 d: AUG 1998
Elizabeth Gregory b: 22 OCT 1933 d: 1938
Henry Ayrton Chaplin , L.R.C.P. & S. b: 21 AUG 1876 d: 2 JUL 1905
Matilda Charlotte Chaplin , M.D. b: 20 JUN 1846 d: 19 JUL 1883
William Edward Ayrton , F.R.S. F.R.S. b: 14 SEP 1847 d: 6 NOV 1908
Edith Chaplin Ayrton b: 1 OCT 1874 d: 5 MAY 1945
Israel Zangwill b: 21 JAN 1864 d: 1 AUG 1926
Margaret (Peggy) Zangwill b: 12 APR 1910
Oliver Louis Zangwill b: 29 OCT 1913 d: 12 OCT 1987
Joy Moult b: 1924 d: 2016
David Ayrton Zangwill b: FEB 1952 d: 1953
Ayrton Israel Zangwill b: 15 AUG 1906
James Edward Nugent b: 3 JAN 1833
Margaret Louisa Nugent d: JUL 1905
Philip O'Reilly d: 24 SEP 1912
Edward Nugent Ayrton b: 13 MAR 1815 d: 28 NOV 1873
William Edward Ayrton , F.R.S. F.R.S. b: 14 SEP 1847 d: 6 NOV 1908
Matilda Charlotte Chaplin , M.D. b: 20 JUN 1846 d: 19 JUL 1883
Edith Chaplin Ayrton b: 1 OCT 1874 d: 5 MAY 1945
Israel Zangwill b: 21 JAN 1864 d: 1 AUG 1926
Margaret (Peggy) Zangwill b: 12 APR 1910
Oliver Louis Zangwill b: 29 OCT 1913 d: 12 OCT 1987
Joy Moult b: 1924 d: 2016
David Ayrton Zangwill b: FEB 1952 d: 1953
Ayrton Israel Zangwill b: 15 AUG 1906
Phoebe Sarah (Hertha) Marks b: 28 APR 1854 d: 26 AUG 1923
Barbara Bodichon Ayrton b: 3 APR 1886 d: OCT 1950
Gerald Gould b: 1885 d: 1936
Michael Ayrton b: 20 FEB 1921 d: 17 NOV 1975
Frederick Ayrton b: 20 MAR 1812 d: 20 JUN 1873
Margaret Hicks b: 1808 d: 12 SEP 1873
Agnes Nugent Ayrton b: 31 MAY 1834 d: 24 APR 1907
Charles Cyril Hicks , Dr b: 1832 d: ABT OCT 1894
Frederick Ayrton b: 1836
Acton Smee Ayrton b: 5 AUG 1816 d: 30 NOV 1886
John Hyde Ayrton b: 4 JAN 1818 d: 1845
James Nugent b: 1792 d: 25 JAN 1815
?
Peggy ? d: ABT 1820