Edgar King

Edgar King

b: ABT 943
d: 8 JUL 975
Biography
From the Encyclopaedia Britannica, King Edgar:

b. 943/944
d. July 8, 975
King of the Mercians and Northumbrians from 957 who became king of the West Saxons, or Wessex, in 959 and is reckoned as king of all England from that year. He was efficient and tolerant of local customs, and his reign was peaceful. He was most important as a patron of the English monastic revival.

The younger son of Edmund I, king of the English, Edgar was made king of the Mercians and Northumbrians in place of Eadwig, his brother, who was deposed. On Eadwig's death (Oct. 1, 959), Edgar succeeded to the West Saxon throne. His ecclesiastical policy was also that of the archbishop of Canterbury, St. Dunstan, who insisted on strict observance of the Benedictine Rule. The king supported Archbishop Oswald of York and Bishop Aethelwold of Winchester in founding abbeys. Edgar's laws were the first in England to prescribe penalties for nonpayment of tithes and Peter's pence, the annual contribution made by Roman Catholics for support of the Holy See.


And in a separate note:

The monasteries: The movement for reform began in England about 940 and soon came under the influence of reforms in Fleury and Lorraine. King Edgar, an enthusiastic supporter, promoted the three chief reformers to important positions--Dunstan to Canterbury, Aethelwold to Winchester, and Oswald to Worcester and later to York. The secular clergy were violently ejected from Winchester and some other places; Oswald gradually replaced them with monks at Worcester. All three reformers founded new houses, including the great monasteries in the Fenlands, where older houses had perished in the Danish invasion; but Oswald had no success in Northumbria. The reformers, however, were concerned with more than monasticism--they paid great attention to other needs of their dioceses; the scholars Abbot Aelfric and Archbishop Wulfstan, trained by the reformers, directed much of their writings to improving the education and morals of the parish clergy and, through them, of the people.

The monastic revival resulted in a great revival of both vernacular and Latin literature, of manuscript production and illumination, and of other forms of art. It reached its zenith in the troubled years of King Ethelred II (reigned 978-1016), after a brief, though violent, reaction to monasticism following Edgar's death.
Facts
  • ABT 943 - Birth -
  • 8 JUL 975 - Death -
  • BET 959 AND 975 - Fact -
  • Occupation - King of England
Ancestors
   
Edward the Elder King
874 - 17 JUL 924
 
 
Edmund
921 - 26 MAY 946
  
  
  
?
 
Edgar King
ABT 943 - 8 JUL 975
  
 
  
?
 
 
?
  
  
  
?
 
Family Group Sheet - Child
PARENT (M) Edmund
Birth921
Death26 MAY 946 Pucklechurch, England
Marriageto ?
FatherEdward the Elder King
Mother?
PARENT (U) ?
Birth
Death
Father?
Mother?
CHILDREN
MEdgar King
BirthABT 943
Death8 JUL 975
Marriageto ?
Family Group Sheet - Spouse
PARENT (M) Edgar King
BirthABT 943
Death8 JUL 975
Marriageto ?
FatherEdmund
Mother?
PARENT (U) ?
Birth
Death
Father?
Mother?
CHILDREN
MAthelread II
BirthABT 968
Death23 APR 1016London
Marriageto Aelfgifu Queen
Marriage1002to Emma
MEdward the Martyr
BirthABT 963
Death18 MAR 978Corfe, Dorset, when visiting his half-brother Ethelred
Evidence
[S22114] 'Encyclopaedia Britannica'
Descendancy Chart
Edgar King b: ABT 943 d: 8 JUL 975
?
Athelread II b: ABT 968 d: 23 APR 1016
Edmund II King b: ABT 993 d: 30 NOV 1016
Emma
Goda b: ABT 1011
Ralph de Maunt d: 21 DEC 1057
Goda
Maud
John de Sudely d: 1165
William de Tracy , Sir b: ABT 1143
?
?
?
?
Ralph de Sudely b: 1142
Otwell de Sudely d: ABT 1195
Edward King b: 1003 d: 5 JAN 1066
Edith d: 1075
Alfred d: 1036
Edward the Martyr b: ABT 963 d: 18 MAR 978