George Sowley Holroyd , Kt.

George Sowley Holroyd , Kt.

b: 31 OCT 1758
d: 21 NOV 1831
From "The Chaplin and Skinner Families" December 1902 (pages 4 to 6):

>> There were fourteen children of this marriage, namely:-
(1) MARY ANNE, born 31st December, 1788, and died 14th May, 1813.
Married Captain Charles Court, but left no children.
(2) GEORGE CHAPLIN HOLROYD, born 9th September, 1790, and died 24th November, 1871. He had six children, of whom the second was His Honour Henry Holroyd, County Court Judge, who died on the 11th January, 1896.
(3) CHARLES HOLROYD, born 31st January, 1792, and died without issue
on 13th September, 1830
(4) HENRY AMOS HOLROYD, horn 24th May, 1793 and died 23rd February, 1794.
(5) EDWARD HOLROYD, born 24th July, 1794, and died 29th January, 1881. .He was a barrister, and was subsequently appointed Senior Commissioner of the Bankruptcy Court in London. He had six children, of whom Edward Dundas Holroyd, Q.C., who now lives at Melboume, and is a Judge of the Supreme Court of Victoria, is one.
(6) SARAH LOUISA, born 4th July, 1796, and died 11th January, 1876.
(7) FREDERICK COURT, born 28th November, 1797, and died in infancy.
(8) THOMAS HOLROYD, born 23rd March, 1799, and died at Hampton Court Palace on 27th November, 1893, at the ageof 94, leaving a daughter, Sarah Morgan Chamberlain, widow of the late Rear Admiral William Charles Chamberlain, R.N.
(9) JAMES JOHN HOLROYD, born 28th September, 1800, died 3rd February, 1876, having had nine children.
(10) WILLIAM JAMES HOLROYD, born 20th August, 1802 and died 6th March, 1803
(11) HENRY HOLROYD, born 5th April, 1804, and died 29th September, 1859, leaving four children.
(12) SARAH MARIA, born 26th May, 1805 and died 3rd August, 1815.
(13) CHARLOTTE, born 8th September, 1806, and died 30th June, 1811.
(14) FREDERIC HOLROYD, born 14th March, 1810, died 29th June, 1811.

Mr. Justice Holroyd, after sitting on the Bench for twelve years, resigned his office on I7th November, 1828; he died on 21st November, 1831, and was buried at Wargrave; and the following epitaph, written by his friend Lord Brougham, was engraved on the monument erected in Wargrave Church by his son Thomas Holroyd:--

"Sacred to the Memory of Sir George Sowley Holroyd, Kt., one of the Justices of the Court of King's Bench:
A lawyer to be ranked high among the greatest of any age; endowed with an original genius to enlarge the bounds of any science, but peculiarly adapted to that which he pursued: a counsellor sure, faithful, and sagacious; an advocate learned, ready, skilful, correct; a judge upright, firm, patient, humane; of a gentle nature, serene temper, simple and kindly manners; but of principles pure, lofty, inflexible; he was not more honoured in his public capacity than beloved on all the private relations of his blameless life.

Born xxxi October, MDCCLVIII.
Married x September, MDCCLXXXVII
Raised to the Bench xiv February, MDCCCXVI
Resigned xvii November, MDCCCXXVIII.
Died xxi November, MDCCCXXXI"

Lady Holroyd died on the 11th November, 1848, at Exmouth, in her 81st year, and was buried with her husband at Wargrave.

(2) The Rev. Edward Chaplin (see below)<<


In Effie Irene Pearce's red covered photo album/scrapbook a cutting from The Times gives an extract from the paper a century before - on Monday 11 November, 1822 - which mentions Mr Justice Holroyd as one of the guests at the Dinner at Guildhall "The customary feast upon the Chief Magistrate's accession was given at Guildhall on Saturday (Lord Mayor's Day). The preparations and appointments were in the usual style and taste. The Hall, in which the chief guests sat, was illuminated with gas......."

END
George Sowley Holroyd

From The Dictionary of National Biography

(He) owes his origin to the same stirps from which Lord Sheffield descended; the direct ancestors of both, George and Isaac, being the sons of Isaac Holroyd, of Crawcrofte in Rishworth, in the parish of Elland in the county of York. The judge was the great-grandson of George, and the eldest son of another George, by Eleanor, the daughter of Henry Sowley, of Appleby, Esq. He was born at York on October 31, 1758, and was sent to


but, in consequence of his father suffering some severe losses from unfortunate speculations, he was removed from Harrow, and in April 1774 was articled to Mr. Borthwick, an attorney in London. At the end of three years, he entered Gray’s Inn, and commenced business as a special pleader in April 1779.

During the eight years that he pursued this branch of the profession, he adopted, with Romilly, Christian, and Baynes, one of the most effective preparations for the contests into which they were about to enter. Meeting at each other’s chambers, they discussed legal points previously arranged, one of them taking the affirmative side, another supporting the contrary part, and a third summing up the arguments and deciding the question as judge. On June 26, 1787, he was called to the bar, and about three months after married Sarah, the daughter of Amos Chaplin, Esq., who brought him fourteen children.

He joined the Northern Circuit, and the character he had acquired while under the bar of solidity of judgement and professional ability secured to him a fair proportion of business, both in the north and in Westminster Hall. Ere he had been called a year his name appears in two cases in the ‘Term Reports.’ (ii.445, 480.) During the twenty nine years that he remained at the bar his fee-book shows the rapid increase of his practice, proving also the advance of his reputation by the number and importance of the cases submitted to his direction. Of a retiring disposition, he persisted in declining the offer of a silk gown, and therefore his merits were comparatively unrecognised by the general public; but among the legal community his superiority was fully acknowledged, and it was said of him that ‘he was absolutely born with a genius for law.’ So highly were his instructions esteemed that, while at the bar, no less than forty-seven pupils availed themselves of them, among whom were Mr Baron Bullock, Mr Baron Bolland, and Mr Justice Cresswell. In 1811 he greatly distinguished himself in the celebrated case of privilege, Burdett v The Speaker of the House of Commons, by his luminous arguments on behalf of the plaintiff. (14 East’s Reports, 11.) In the last year of his pracice at the bar he was sent by the government to Guernsey, at the head of a commission to enquire into and determine certain ‘doleances’ complained of by persons resident in that island.

At length he was appointed a judge of the King’s Bench. In that court he sat for more than twelve years, from February 14, 1816, to November 17, 1828, the date of his resignation, fully sustaining the reputation he had acquired, and largely con


sociated with such erudite and discriminating judges as Lord Tenterden, Sir John Bayley, and Sir Joseph Littledale. His patience never seemed to be wearied; his decisions were always clear and well-founded, for his memory was the storehouse of all the arguments that had ever been advanced for or against the case he was to judge; and his taste, with no effort at display, was so exquisite that he made the driest subjects interesting. The infirmities which obliged him to retire, in three years terminated his life, on November 21, 1831, at his residence at Hare Hatch in Berkshire. A monument is erected to his memory in the parish chrch of Wargrave, with an inscription, written by Lord Brougham, faithfully and eloquently describing his merits and his virtues.

Of the judge’s fourteen children six survived him, one of whom exercised as a commissioner of the Court of Bankruptcy till the recent alteration of that court the functions of his laborious office with the same legal learning, the same patience, and the same suavity of temper that distinguished his father.

End

Extracts from a booklet with a blue cover, in very poor condition, with a handwritten note on the cover indicating that it was given to Holroyd Chaplin on 8 February 1882 (or was it 1881?).
See Family Tree Maker – Holroyd entries.


A Branch of the Holroyd Family

A letter pasted inside the cover reads:

Wimbledon
Monday night, 8th February 1881

My dear Holroyd,

I enclose your the ‘Branch of the Holroyd Family’ as promised but recollect, "keep it dark’ for I have a great horror of appearing to blow my own trumpet!! Nor would I have put in any thing about self if Edward Dundas had not wished it.

Yours very ..
T.H.

Page 3:

TO EDWARD DUNDAS HOLROYD, ESQ., QC
AT MELBOURNE, IN THE COLONY OF VICTORIA.


Wimbledon, August 1879

My dear Edward,

Having resided, like yourself, for many years in the East, I can quite understand your desire to preserve the remembrance of your elder English relatives, and to know something of the generation which has arisen since you quitted the old country. I have endeavoured to assist you by drawing up a short sketch of the history of the family, and collecting a few particulars which seemed to me worthy of being recorded, concerning several of its members. At your request, I have introduced some incidents of my own life, which I should otherwise have omitted. I trust the pamphlet may prove useful as a family and chronicle, and may enable you to transmit some interesting memorials to your descendants in Australia.

I can,
My dear Edward,
Your very affectionate Uncle,
Thomas Holroyd

Page 4: Is blank

Pages 5 to 13: Are incorporated in the Family Tree file so are not repeated here. See Sir George Sowley Holroyd (born 31 October 1758) in that file, his children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren]


Appendix A (pages 14 to 18)

MR JUSTICE HOLROYD BY LORD BROUGHAM
Extract from " The Edinburgh Review," 1839.

Mr Justice Holroyd was one of the most able, most learned, and most virtuous men that ever in any age adorned the profession of the Law. Endowed with feeble spirits, and having never cultivated the gifts of fancy, and probably not possessing any range of imagination, he chose for his study the severer branches of forensic exertion; and by assiduous labour long bestowed upon that dry study, became possessed of all the knowledge of our jurisprudence which industry can acquire, and the greatest natural sagacity marshall. Until the Practice is added to the study of the law, the most diligent student cannot be said to have made himself a good a lawyer; nor can he even ascertain whether or not he is destined ever to attain that eminence. After he began to plead below the bar, which is the particular branch of the profession that tends more directly than any other to unfold and to improve the faculties leading to this most desirable station, he soon became known for the conscientious application of his powers and his knowledge to the business he was entrusted with; and both his pupils benefited largely by his instructions, and his clients were comforted with a full and ready assistance in all their difficulties. When he had obtained considerable reputation in this walk, he entered Westminster Hall; and soon rose to the first eminence upon that great circuit which distributes the streams of justice from the centre of the judicial system, through the vast counties of York and Lancaster, and the four northern provinces.

It was soon found that this distinguished person was far indeed from being a mere special pleader. He possessed a clearness and quickness of apprehension, a vigour and firmness of understanding, a just and becoming confidence in his own opinion, that shone through his natural modesty -- a modesty singularly graceful, and allied to a most amiable and gentle nature, which neither the contentions of the forum could roughen, nor the severest of studies harden. To whatever branch of investigation he had devoted his life, in that he would have eminently excelled; and as in the stricter sciences he would have been a great discover, so he might be truly said to have a genius for law.

His views were profound, and they were original. He saw points in a light that was unexpected and felicitous. But he reasoned, and he decided upon no affected conceits, such as Westminster Hall turns crotchets, or fancies, or whims. His admirable judgement always maintained its sway; and his opinion upon all matters submitted to him was still more remarkable for being sound then his reasonings were for being learned and ingenious. A result of all this great merit, which did more honour to him than to the other branch of his profession, was, that although no one enjoyed so high a legal reputation, few gained their professional income with harder labour. Whenever a difficult and important question arose, Mr Holroyd's opinion was eagerly sought upon all the cases which grew out of it, or became connected with it; and when ordinary matters of easy solution came into dispute, or where opinions upon questions of course were to be taken in point form, or where causes were coming into court of which anyone could settle the pleadings, or conduct the minor departments of the suit after it came into court, others were selected to perform the easy, every-day, lucrative work; the love of a little patronage operating on the attorney's mind more than a sense of justice. Nothing was more common, therefore, than to see this great lawyer answer eight or ten questions upon the construction of a cramp and obscure will, or the course of action fit to be pursued in seeking for the establishment of complicated rights; or the course of pleading most safe in defending nice positions; while ordinary men were in the same time reaping the golden harvest of ordinary business, presenting no kind of difficulty, and level to the most humble capacity.

In Court, he of course shone less than in Chambers. His figure was low, but his voice was pleasing; until interrupted by an affection of the trachea, which gave him a kind of constant cough for many years, and at last terminated his valuable life. His delivery was, if not striking or commanding, perfectly correct and natural. His style of argument was of the very highest order, although somewhat less venturous in topics than it ought to have been with so great and jurisconsult, or rather steering too near the defined and bold coast of authority. But his language was choice; his order lucid; his argumention close; his discussion of cases, and his application of them, masterly; -- showing an easy familiarity with all principles and all points, whether recondite or of common occurrence; and a profound judgement in weighing differences and resemblances, and tracing analogies and consequences, which was in vain sought for elsewhere. His famous argument in the case of Parliamentary Privilege (See Burdett v. Abbot, East 14) is truly a masterpiece. The history of the law is there traced through the stream of cases with a superior hand, while the bearings of all authority in favour of the argument are given, with a felicity only equalled by the dexterity with which the adverse cases are got rid of, and their force dissipated. The taste, withal, considering the exciting nature of the subject, is throughout severely chaste; nor can the most fastidious critic descry a spot whereon to fix for blame; while the most zealous enemy of Parliamentary oppression cannot find any ground for complaint in the strenuous exertions of the advocate. Arguments like these at once control the judge, as if they came from a higher authority; edify the party in whose cause they are urged; diffuse the useful light of information among the profession; and conserve pure and untainted the most refined taste in composition.

Although the habits of this illustrious lawyer did not often place him, and never voluntarily, in the position of a leader, it yet would occasionally happen that he might conduct some cause of importance before a jury; and then his admirable judgement, ready knowledge of his subject, and all its legal relations, correct taste, and inimitable suavity of temper, united all voices in his praise. His arrangement of the subject, and his diction, were alike perfect; what he wanted in the vigour of declamation, to which he made no pretention, was amply supplied by the combined force of his reasoning and by his luminous statement of facts; nor was he ever engaged in causes which demanded resources of wit or of pathos, the only portions of the rhetorical art to which he neither laid any claim, nor could find substitutes in his own proper stores.

In his conduct at the bar, whether at consultation or in court, whether as a leader or a junior and pleader, he was perfect. No man was more respectful to his leaders when a junior; none less assuming when he led. But tho’ never wanting in courtesy, whichever station he filled, he never failed firmly to assert his own opinion, whether as to the law of the case or the discretion of conducting it, when he had a leader; nor to act with the entire resolution that belonged to his responsible position when he led himself. In every instance however, the cause and the client were observed to be his sole object. To advance them was always his aim; to put himself forward, never. The most happy illustrations, the most sound legal topics, were suggested by him quietly, almost secretly, to his leader; from whose far less learned lips came forth, as if they had been his own, the sense of Mr Holroyd; who, so far from giving the least indication of the sources whence the point had come, only said a word in its support when absolute necessity required.

Having long adorned the bar, he was raised to the bench, chiefly, it was believed, through the exertions of Lord Ellenborough, who had known him intimately, and has always felt for him unbounded respect and esteem. As a Judge, he fully sustained the high character which he carried with him from the forum. When he sat at Nisi Prius, it was delightful see the familiar ease with which he handled all points that could be made before him, come they ever so unexpectedly upon him, or be they ever so much out of the everyday course of business. The manner, too, in which he dealt with them attracted a special admiration "Sir," said Mr Sergeant Hullock, captivated with this, "he is like one of the old men, the great fountains of our law." "But with a good sense and a just taste, rather belonging to our age than to theirs," -- was the proper and correct addition of one to whom the Sergeant's remark had been addressed.

The only defect which anyone could charge on his judicial performances, was that from which it is so difficult for anyone to be free who has been raised to the bench from behind the bar, and without the experience of leading causes. He cannot well take the larger and more commanding view of cases, which the leader naturally adopts, and to which he confines himself rather than details. Hence, at least before experiencing of trying many causes has lent such lawyers expertness, they feel some difficulty in grappling with larger and complicated cases; are apt to lose themselves in particulars; and are found unable to dispose of more than a very limited number of causes, however well they may try those which they are able to dispatch. To this remark Mr Justice Holroyd formed no exception. While no man tried a great case better, few so well, he would suffer a heavy cause paper to fall into arreer, from not aportioning his labour justly amongst the more important and more trivial matters. Indeed, except Lord Tenterden, and one or two of the latter judges raised to the bench before the habits of the pleader had been formed, there are hardly to be found any exceptions to rule which we have stated, as deduced from long experience of the profession.

Than this eminent and excellent person, no man was more beloved of in private life, or could be more justly prized in all its relations. Of the strictest integrity, of unsullied professional honour, of the most sweet and equal temper, whether amidst the cares of private life (nor was he unacquainted with both its sorrows and difficulties), or in the discharge of his public duties as a magistrate, exposed to the wranglings of the bar, or in the part which he so long took as an advocate among all the contentions of the forum, his good-humour was constant and unruffled; so much so, that it seemed to cost him no effort at all either to exercise unwearied patience on the bench, or to command his suavity of temper at the bar. Of his valuable arguments, and of his learned and luminous judgments, the monuments remain in the "Term Reports" for the last thirty years of his life; of his eminently expressive countenance, at once sagacious, thoughtful, and mild, the likeness remains in Reynolds’ portrait and print. It is only speaking this sense of all Westminster Hall to add, that, as his loss was deeply felt by the profession, so it will be very long indeed, in all probability, before such a great luminary of the law shall arise to shed a light over its dark precincts, and to exalt the glory of the bar (See also Foss’s Lives of the Judges.)

Copied from a Poem called "The Bar."
In solid worth and lending near akin,
Rough as two pines without, as sweet within,
HOLROYD with mind like glass without a flaw,
And Wood* a neat compendium of the Law.
Fashioned with feet of clay -- but head of gold,
A compound image he, like that of old,
True as the season came, "paired off" from town,
And here in friendly union posted down.
So as he is sung in verse or prose,
Brentford’s two kings marched, smelling at one rose.

*Mr Justice Holroyd and Mr. Baron Wood

The following Epitaph written by Lord Brougham was engraved on the Monument erected in Wargrave Church by his Son Thomas Holroyd.

[For the Epitaph itself see Family Tree, Notes on George Sowley Holroyd]


Appendix B (pages 19 to 21)

On the Monument at Calcutta
Sacred to the Memory of
MARY ANNE, Wife of Captain Charles Court, Marine Surveyor-General, and Eldest Daughter of George Sowley Holroyd, Esq., Barrister of Gray's Inn Inn, who departed this life on the
14th May, 1813, aged 24 years.

If worth were to be estimated by the unspeakable grief of a disconsolate Husband, and the deep and unfeigned regret of all who had the happiness of her acquaintance, hers would rank high indeed, but, alas! she has fled from erring judgement to that Tribunal which alone can duly appreciate the mild and gentle virtues which adorned her amiable mind.


Extract -- "Madras Government Gazette," the 18th October, 1821

On Sunday, the ninth of September, about half past four o'clock, at his home at Ballygunge, departed this life Captain Charles Court, of the Honourable Companiy's Bombay Marine Establishment, and Marine Surveyor-General of India; and on the following day his remains were removed under a discharge of Minute Guns from the Honourable Company's Surveying Ship "Meriton," and were received and escorted to the place of Internment by a large Detachment of His Majesty's 87th Regiment, Commanded by Lieutenant-Colonel Shaw, CB, and interred with the Military Honours due to his rank.

The early services of the beloved and lamented Officer in question, are best described by the following testimony borne to his merits by the able and justly respected late Superintendent of the Bombay Marine, W. T. Money, Esq (now one of the Honourable Court of Directors,) in his address to that Government under date of the 15th July, 1809.

"Upon this occasion, Honourable Sir, I have to discharge a very pleasing part of my duty in bringing to your notice the services and merits of a very respectable Officer.

Lieutenant Court after acquiring a knowledge of his profession in the East India Service was appointed to the Honourable Company's Marine in the year 1790, and served as second Lieutenant of the "Panther" on a cursory Survey of the Red Sea, under Lieutenant White, and in the same station on board the Bombay Frigate "Commodore Picket," he was actively engaged in the reduction of Colombo and its dependencies.

As first Lieutenant of the same ship he gallantly served at the reduction of Manado on Celebes, and was appointed to the Command of Fort Amsterdam, which he held for nine months under the most critical circumstances, in a hostile country. In reward of his distinguished merits in this trying situation, he was appointed President at Manado and Commandant of all the British Troops on Celebes.

During the period of his Command in this important post which he held for seven years he completely succeeded in consiliating the vast population of that valuable Island, and attaching all ranks to the British Government; having by the personal influence which his own conduct had acquired for him, accomplished a treaty with all the chiefs by which very considerable advantages were secured to the Honourable Company, and many barbarous customs, which tended to render the people, naturally mild and offensive, cruel and vindictive, were solemnly abandoned.

Had peace not restored to the Dutch their possessions to the Eastward, Manado would have been rendered by Mr Court's prosperous administration a valuable acquisition to the East India Company.

Upon the restoration of the Malaccas Lieutenant Court returned to the active duties of his profession, and in Command of the "Princess Augusta" with a small squadron he blockaded Severndroog where he captured 36 vessels, seven of the largest of which he cut from under the guns of the fort, and obtained restitution of a Dow laden with Company's coffee to a considerable amount.

From this Station he was recalled and selected to command the Honourable Company’s Ship "Ternate" in pursuit of "La Fortune," "Monsieur La Meme," who had recently captured the "Fly" but upon his arrival at Bombay he found that the enemy was a prize to his Majesty's Ship "Concorde."

Lieutenant Court was then, at particular request, appointed to Command of the "Panther," and proceeded with Lord Valentia to the Red Sea where he prosecuted a tedious, an arduous, and a difficult survey of the Abyssinian Coast with great credit to himself and perfect satisfaction to his Lordship.

Soon after his return to Bombay in 1807, he was selected to be my Assistant, and from his attention, assiduity, and ability, I have derived such valuable aid in the discharge of my public duties, that I part from Mr Court's services with the utmost regret, and shall ever hold them in thankful remembrance."

Captain Court, while in England, married one of the daughters of the present Sir George Holroyd, a young lady whose personal attractions were only surpassed by her unassuming virtues and superior mental attainment is.

In the year 1810, Captain Court was appointed by the Honourable Court of Directors Marine Surveyor-General of India, for which important office his superior abilities rendered him particularly qualified, and he arrived at Calcutta in the following year.

In the year 1813, he had the misfortune to lose his inestimable Partner, and from that period to the day of the termination of his own earthly career he shrunk from the world's observation, and never regained the wonted serenity of his mind nor the vigour of his faculties.

The above inadequate sketch of the virtues and worth of the deceased are humbly recorded as an unfeigned tribute of affectionate regard for his memory, by those who revered him while living and who will never cease to deplore his loss. Calcutta Journal.


Appendix C (pages 21 to 25)

Account of the Action of the 3rd July 1810, between the Ceylon, Windham, and Astell, East Indiamen, and two large French Frigates and a Corvette; copied from the Log of the Honourable C. S. Astell, by George Chaplain Holroyd [who was a Cadet on board].

At daylight three strange sail in sight bearing N.E. close hauled on the larboard tack. Called the hands out, beat to quarters, and cleared ship for action. At four minutes past seven signalled to prepare for battle, shortened sale, Commodore (Ceylon) under top sails;
7.18 Signal to keep in the Commodore wake, bore up to get in the Commodore wake;
7.30 Signal to haul the wind on the starboard tack;
7.35 Land bearing E. half N, the three strangers on the larboard tack bearing N.E by N. distant seven miles;
8.20 Ceylon made the private signal;
8.35 Signal to number strange sale seen;
8.40 Signal to wait the attack of the enemy;
8.45 Signal that the strangers are enemies;
9.16 Two of the strangers were bearing W.by N. distant six or seven miles; it
9.30 The third stranger wore and loosed top gallant sails;
9.55 Blowing fresh, took in main top gallant sail, and made signal to Ceylon that we were over-pressed with sail and not able to keep company on that account;
10.15 Signal to continue our course under easy sail;
10.35 Took in main sail;
10.37 The Commodore telegraphed.........[set of numbers]
11.15 In third reefs blowing;
11.25 The Windham telegraphed the Commodore, .... [set of numbers]
12.00 Two of the strangers astern on the starboard tack coming up, the smallest a Corvette, about three miles distant, carrying 22 guns, reconnoitring the fleet, the other six or seven astern a very heavy frigate, and the third stranger bearing N.by E., nine or 10 miles, to appearance a frigate of the same description;
12.10 The Ceylon telegraphed in the following numbers....[set of numbers]
12.30 The Ceylon bore up to come near us, at the same time the Corvette about one mile distance wore to join the frigate that was astern, the frigate about five miles off;
12.35 Signal to hoist same covers as the Commodore with a pendant;
1.05 The Corvette, three or four miles astern, wore again;
1.15 The frigate, on the starboard tack, bearing N.E. half N. nine or 10 miles distant, tacked and stood towards us under all sail;
1.30 The Commodore hoisted the red ensign and pendant, which we did also, the largest Frigate and Corvette nearly two miles astern;
1.45 The Ceylon made signal to keep in close order closing towards the leading ship or van;
1.55 The Frigates on the larboard tack bearing N. N. E. hoisted English colours, and when she bore S.S.W. tacked again to join her Consort
2.10 The largest Frigate and Corvette, on our weather quarter, distant half a mile. The Frigate, after firing a gun to leeward, hoisted French colours, and immediately opened fire upon us (the Ceylon and Windham ahead), which we returned, and continued in close action. The Commodore and Wyndham firing upon her at the same time;
3.00 The Corvette came into action, bore up under our stern, and raked us, and took her station on our lee quarter, returned her fire with our after larboard guns;
3.15 The Corvette bore up to get without reach of our shot, we still continuing closely engaged with the frigate. The Ceylon and Wyndham still ahead, the Ceylon engaged and the Wyndham firing as her guns would bear;
3.30 The red ensign was shot away and gaff brought down, hoisted the blue ensign;
3.40 Captain Hay was carried off the quarter deck severely wounded in the thigh.
4.15 The Ceylon dropped between us and the enemy, and kept up a spirited fire. Ceased firing and backed the main top sail to get clear of her, when we renewed the action. The Frigate then made more sail, and shot ahead firing into the Ceylon and Windham as she passed, directing most of her fire on the Wyndham, and after engaging her for a short time and getting a little ahead of her, the Frigate wore right athwart our bows; bore up with the intend to board, but could not affect it, she having too much way. When about half a ships' length from us we poured a broadside and commenced a spirited fire of musquetry fore and aft, which completely cleared her upper deck and silenced her. She then hauled her wind on the larboard tack and engaged the Ceylon as she passed. When astern of the Ceylon, the Frigate tacked, and in stays her main and mizen top masts went over the side. As soon as we saw this, hove all aback with the intention of boarding her a second time, but the Commodore and Windham drawing ahead as we thought with a view of diverting the attention of the Frigate that had not been in action and also the Corvette from the disabled one, and of concentrating the whole of our force against her, filled again to get into our station and when abreast of the Commodore gave him three cheers, which he returned and got into our station astern and got all ready to renew the action with the fresh Frigare. She, instead of going to the assistance of her consort, made sail.
5.45 We being the sternmost ship, brought us to close action, pouring in a heavy fire of round and grape shot, and also from musquetry and swivels in her top, which we returned and continued for nearly an hour closely engaged, the Commodore and Windham a little ahead keeping up a heavy fire on the enemy as they could bring their guns to bear, the Corvette on our starboard quarter keeping up a cross fire at us.
6.45 The Frigate shot ahead of us, ceased our fire when she was abreast of the Ceylon, and after engaging her a short time closely, the Ceylon bore up, as we supposed, with the intention of boarding her, bore up to support her. The Ceylon passed under the Frigates' stern, and observing she did not fire we luffed up under his lee quarter and asked him what were his intentions, he replied that he had struck to the Frigate, that Captain Minton and his chief officer were shot, and the ship completely disabled, to continue the contest longer would be sacrificing lives to no purpose; the Frigate was then a short gunshot from us on our starboard bow, and the Windham about a mile astern. Our ship being completely crippled in masts, yards, rigging, and sails, many guns being rendered useless by the long continuance of the action, and making three feet water per hour;
7.20 Put our helm up and stood to the westward. The Frigate perceiving this again opened a tremendous fire upon us, which we returned as long as we were within shot. When without gun shot ceased firing and stood to the Nd and Wd.
7.50 Two of the enemy in chase;
8.00 The enemy gained on us; got the ship in as great state of readiness as circumstances would admit, to defend her to the last extremity, and threw the Honourable Company's dispatches over-board.


Memo: George Chaplin Holroyd was appointed Captain of two guns on the gun deck, exactly opposite the main mast, which the sailors turn the slaughterhouse, a very honourable station. A ball came through the side of the ship, the splinters knocked him down senseless for a few moments, he got a cut on his forehead over his left eye, and a small one close under his eye. After five hours closer action, being favoured by the darkness of the night, the Astell got off and arrived at Madras on the 1st August, 1810. It is very remarkable that this action happened on the Cambridge Commemoration Day; at that time last year George Chaplin Holroyd was feasting most sumptuously in Trinity Hall. E.H.

The result of the Action was the Capture of the Ceylon and Windham and escape of the Astell.

Copy of the certificate sent in by the Commander of the "pastel," to General St. Leger, which was not published at the time, as that Officer did not forwarded to Government.

I do hereby certify that the undermentioned Gentleman Cadets, who were on board of the Astell in the action of the 3rd July, behaved on that occasion with the most exemplary gallantry, and contributed as much as lay in their power to the defence of the ship. Being an eye-witness to their youthful ardour and undaunted intrepidity, I am confident they will prove shining ornaments to the honourable profession which they have embraced, and I cannot refrain from expressing my high admiration of their correct moral conduct and gentlemanly deportment doing the passage from England.

Where the conduct of all is so deserving of encomium, it may appear invidious to select individual merit, but I am irresistibly led to mention a circumstance that redounds to the honour of Mr G. Holroyd. This gentleman having the command of a gun on the main deck, four men belonging to it were disabled at the same moment, and himself wounded in the face. The remaining four (foreigners) were seized with a panic, and quitted their quarters, but Mr Holroyd instantly brought them back, and under his animated example the gun was fought during the remainder of the action with the greatest ardour and bravery.
Signed: Robert Hay, Commander [this followed by the names of the Gentlemen Cadets].

An interesting and full account of this gallant action may be found in James's Naval History, Vol 5, p. 262, from which it appears that the East India Company presented each of the Captains with the sum of £500 and bestowed a handsome remuneration upon the remaining Officers and Men. A pension of £460 a year was settled on Captain Hay of the Astell, who was desperately wounded, and £2000 presented to the Officers and Crew. The colours of the Astell were three times shot away; Andrew Peters, one of the seamen nailed the pendant to the main top mast head, and was killed as he descended the rigging.


Appendix D (page 25)

George Holroyd entered the East India Company's Military Service 1st March, 1838, and became Colonel 1st March, 1869, he served throughout the operations of the Candahar force in 1838 -- 42, (wounded at Barree Raban, 15th September, 1842), including the advance on Ghuznee and Cabul, and taking of Istaliff (Medal) Gwalior Campaign, and present at the battle of Maharajpore (Bronze Star) Sutlege Campaign of 1845 -- 46, including the battle of Sobraon, horse shot (Medal). (From Hart's Army List)


Appendix E (page 25)

Henry Holroyd was admitted a Member of the Middle Temple in November, 1844, and practiced as a special pleader under the Bar. He was called to the Bar 1853, and went the Oxford Circuit and Lichfield and Stafford Sessions. He reported for some years for the Law Journal, and has since given his services to the Incorporated Council of Law Reporting for England and Wales. He was made a County Court Judge 27 May 1880 by Lord Selbourne -- the Lord Chancellor.


Appendix F (page 26)

Charles Holroyd entered the Military Service of the East India Company on the 11th June, 1839, and retired as a Major-General on the 23rd January, 1875. While in India he was employed most of the time on the Staff in Assam. In the Mutiny in 1857 he received the heartfelt facts of the Europeans resident in Assam, as the following inscription on the Testimonial they presented to him will bear witness.

Presented to
CAPTAIN CHARLES HOLROYD,
Principal Assistant Commissioner, Seebsaugur, Upper Assam,
by the Tea Planters of his District,
in testimony of their high appreciation of the untiring energy, Zeal, and
courage displayed by him during the alarming crisis in 1857,
to whose forethought and skilful arrangements in unravelling the plot
of the Mutineers to massacre all the Europeans in the Province,
they entirely attribute the safety of their lives,
and the preservation of their property.

The above inscription was engraved on a very handsome large silver salver, and presented to Captain Holroyd by the Tea Planters; the Government, however, would not allow him too accept it, and Planters, therefore, sent it to England to his Brother, Henry Holroyd, Barrister-at-Law, with a request that he would presented to his Brother on his retirement from the Service.


Appendix G (page 26)

Henry Mills entered the Military Service of the East India Company, 20th October, 1840, and became a Major-General on the 12th August, 1876. He served in the Campaign of 1840 in Afghanistan with the force under General Nott, and was present in the various actions from Candahar to Peshawar (Medal), Gwalior Campaign, and present at the battle of Maharajpore, 29th December 1843, (Bronze Star), Sutlege Campaign in 1845 -- 46 -- including the battles of Moodkee and Ferozeshah, where his horse was wounded (Medal and Clasp). During the Mutiny in 1857, employed in moving troops to the Front (From Harts Army List.)


Appendix H (page 27)

Edward Holroyd practised as a Special Pleader for seven years under the Bar, having a large business and ten pupils, some of whom became eminent, including Sir David Dundas, afterwards Solicitor-General. He was called to the Bar on the 26 April 1826; in November, 1828, he was appointed by Lord Lyndhurst one of the Commissioners of Bankrupts under the old system, and on the 21st October, 1831, he was appointed by Lord Brougham a Commissioner of the Bankruptcy Court then established, and held the position of Senior Commissioner on the abolition of the Court in December, 1869, having been in office longer than any Judge then on the Bench. On his retirement he was thanked by the Bar and the Solicitors of his Court for his unvarying courtesy and kindness while sitting as a Judge.

Appendix I (page 27)

George Frederic Holroyd was sent to Winchester College as a Commoner in February, 1837. While at Winchester he gained the second Heathcote prize, and also the Duncan prize for Mathematics on its first institution, as well as other prizes. He was entered at Trinity College, Cambridge where he went to reside in October, 1842. In January, 1846, he graduated B.A. a Wrangler and second class in the Classical Tripos, and M.A. in 1849. Whilst at Cambridge he was distinguished as one of the best oarsmen of the Trinity Boat Club, rowed stroke at the head of the River for a year, and number two in the University Crew of 1845, who were victorious. He also rowed in other successful Matches, particularly at the Thames Regatta, when a four-ordered Crew of the T.B.C. defeated the Oxford University four. He passed an examination in Hebrew after he had taken his degree, and continued at Cambridge for some years taking pupils. In 1865 he came forward as a Candidate for the representation of the Town of Northampton in Parliament, at the invitation of the Conservatives, and though defeated succeeded in polling a larger number of votes than any Conservative Candidate had previously obtained. He was called to the Bar at the Inner Temple in Hilary Term, 1873, and devoted himself to Parliamentary practice. His career at the Bar, commenced so late in life, but already full of promise, was cut short by his sudden death in 1874. He was a Magistrate for the County of Northampton, and held a Lieutenant's Commission in the Militia for that County.

Appendix J (page 28)

Edward Dundas Holroyd was educated at Winchester College, which he entered as a Commoner in February, 1841. He obtained several prizes, amongst others Bishop Maltby's prize for speaking, competed for by boys below the sixth form, the second Heathcote, and the Duncan; and carried off in two consecutive years (1845, 1846) the Queen's Gold Medal for the best Latin and English prose essays. In July, 1846, he left Winchester and proceeded in October of the same year to Trinity College, Cambridge, graduated B.A. in January 1851, (having lost a year through illness), and was in the first class of the classical tripos; he took the degree of M.A. in 1854. He was called to the Bar at Gray's Inn, on the 6th June 1855, and on the 27 July, 1859, was admitted to practice as a Barrister in the Supreme Court of Victoria, and subsequently became a Member of the Bar of Tasmania. In 1872 he was offered an appointment as one of the Judges of the Supreme Court of the Colony of Victoria, but declined it, and on the 14th January, 1879, he was appointed a Q.C. in Victoria.

The Reverend T. Compton was Great Grandson of Henry, Lord Bishop of London 1675 to 1712, sixth Son of second Earl of Northampton. He officiated for the Archbishop at the Coronation of William and Mary. (See Burke.)


Appendix K (page 28 to 33)

Statement of Service of Major W.R.M. Holroyd, Bengal Staff Corps.

Service in the Field

Served in the Central India Field Force (under Sir Hugh Rose) with H.M.'s 86th Regiment during the campaign of 1857 -- 58. Present at the siege and capture of Chanderi, the siege and capture of Jhansi, the battle of the Betwa, the action at Koonch, the operations before Calpee and capture of that town.
Wounded dangerously at storming of Jhansi. Mutiny medal and class for Central India. Received complimentary letter, written by order of his Excellency Sir Hugh Rose, from Adjutant General, for "great gallantry" at the siege of Calpee -- (From Hart's Army List)

Nature of employment during service.
Arrived in India in January 1854
Joined the 23rd regiment N.I. the same year
Passed P.H. in January 1855. Interpreter's examination in July following. Obtained certificate of High Proficiency in Persian in April 1865. Served for several months previous to the mutiny of 1857, as Interpreter, 1st Light Cavalry.
After mutiny of 23rd N.I. at Mhow, attached to H.M. 86th Regiment from commencement of 1858 to fall of Calpee. Served for a short time as Interpreter to H.M. 88th Regiment. Appointed Assistant Field Engineer at Cawnpore in July 1858
Appointed Inspector of Schools, Ambalah Circle, August 1858.
Employed on special duty as a member of the Commission for revision of Hindustani test books for Military Officers.
Officiated as Director of Public Instruction, Punjab from January 1867 to April 1867, during absence in Europe of Major Fuller, Director of Public Instruction.

Major Fuller was drowned on the 20th August 1867, whilst crossing a stream near Rawl Pindi, on his way down to Murree. Captain Holroyd was thereupon ordered to take charge of the vacant office, in addition to his other duties, pending further instructions.
By a Government Order, dated 18 February 1868, Captain Holroyd, appointed Director of Public Instruction permanently, and has since held that appointment.

[This is followed by various short extracts from official documents praising him. Two are worth quoting because they describe his work]

Extract letter No 134 dated 16th March 1864, from Director P.I.P., to Secretary to Government, Punjab:

“Very great credit is, in my opinion, due to Lieutenant Holroyd as Inspector, for carrying out the scheme of Branch schools at Dehli so thoroughly, and for organising them on so efficient a basis, with the limited funds that I have from time to time being able to place at his disposal. When the Annual Statements of expenditure have been made up for each school, I feel convinced that in no city of India can education of the same standard be shown to be imparted at anything like the low average cost it bears in Dehli."

Extract from a letter No 10, dated 9th January 1865, to Colonel Norman, Secretary to the Government of India, from D. McLeod, Esq., Financial Commissioner.

“ I deem it incumbent on me, in submitting the results of our proceedings, to point out how largely the Commissioner has been interested to Lieutenant Holroyd for the exceedingly effective date he has afforded them, whereby their labours have been very greatly lightened and expedited. Being the only Military member of the Commission, and that the same time presiding as an Officer in the Educational Department over an important circle, including within it the City of Delhi which may be regarded as the fountain head of the Hindustani language, he was most favourably circumstanced for the prosecution of inquiries such as those devolving on this Commission. And no sooner did he learn that he had been selected as a Member, than he proceeded to Delhi, and there, associating with himself some of the scholars of that place, who from their combining something of European enlightenment with an appreciation of the language and literature of Hindustani, appeared best suited for this purpose, commenced upon the preparation and collection of material for meeting the requirements of the Commission."

It seems though that he may have felt aggrieved at some point - at any rate he wrote a letter dated 27th June 1862 which led to a reply from the Adjutant General dated 24th September 1863 (No. 8045) which states inter alia "This board has recorded an opinion that you behaved with great gallantry in rescuing, with Private Pearson's assistance, a wounded soldier before Calpee, but that the act, however gallant, was not, under the circumstances, deserving of the high honour of the Victoria Cross.

A footnote by Thomas Holroyd adds: It must not be inferred from this that Lieutenant Holroyd applied for the Victoria Cross, he simply pointed out that in the General Order by which the V.C. was conferred on Private Pearson for his gallantry on two occasions, the whole credit of rescuing the wounded soldier before Calpee was assigned to him, whilst Lieutenant Holroyd's name was entirely omitted, although Private Pearson was, on that occasion, acting under his orders, and a promise had been made to Lieutenant Holroyd, without any solicitation on his part, that he should be mentioned in despatches.]


Appendix L (pages 34 to 41)

Thomas Holroyd was educated at Harrow, which, however, he left early to go into the office of a Solicitor, and became afterwards a pupil of the celebrated Conveyancer, Mr Brodie. Mr Holroyd was in the Light-Horse Volunteers, and did duty at the Coronation of George the Fourth in 1821, when disturbances were apprehended in consequence of Queen Caroline’s claiming the right to enter Westminster Hall, which was refused her. The Light-Horse Volunteers (composed entirely of Gentleman, and admitted by ballot) were originally established in 1779, and did duty in the riots of 1780, for which they received the thanks of His Majesty George the Third, of the Lord Mayor and Magistrates of the City of London, and of their fellow Citizens, and were presented by His Majesty with the Standard of Light Dragoons and by the City with two other Standards. At the peace in 1783, the Officers resigned their Commissions, but in May, 1794, again offered their services to the Government, which were accepted.

During the War this Corps had some 1000 members, all splendidly mounted, and in those riotous days, particularly during the Spa Fields, Bread Riots, etc., when there was no Government Police, their services were most valuable. They had a large Barracks, Stabling, and two large riding Schools in Grays-Inn Lane, and from the top of the Arch entering their Barracks, (now the premises of Cubitts, the Builders, where the L.V. "Lion Rampant," may still be seen,) [annotated in the margin here - “Now the Royal Free Hospital”] they commanded a View of the "Spa Fields," where the riotous meetings of the day were held, and from these Barracks they kept the Government, at the Horse Guards, constantly informed of all that was going on.

Mr Holroyd abandoned the Law in 1827, and spent some time on the Continent, when he had the good fortune to give important aid in saving the town of Spa from destruction by fire, as shown in the following correspondence:

[Here followed a letter in French from the Bourgmestre of Spa, Monsieur T.F. Hayemal, praising and thanking him and enclosing an extract of a meeting of the Council of the Société d’assurance mutuelle contre l’Incendie, session of 21 November 1831 which starts:]

“M. Le Directeur expose qu’à l’occasion de l’incendie de Spa un gentilhomme anglais, Mr Thomas Holroyd, s’est particulièrement distingué par son intrépidité, son courage et son sang-froid; que c’est en mème temps à la bonne direction de ses dispositions que la société doit en grand partie de n’avoir pas de plus fortes pertes à déplorer dans cette circonstance; enfin que lors du grand incendie de Spa, le 6 Octobre, ce gentilhomme s’est comporté d’une maniére également remarquable et dévouée.”

They awarded him a silver medal which he may have collected in November, for his letter of thanks, in French, is addressed from Spa:

“Spa, le 28 Novembre, 1831

Monsieur Le Bourmestre

En vous priant d’agréer mes Remerciments pour le rapport que vous avez fait de ma conduite dans les derniers Incendies je vous supplie en même temps de rendre grâce de ma part a Monsieur le Prèsident et aux Members du Conseil de la Compagnie des assurances, pour la Medaille et la lettre trop favorable qui l’accompagnait. Bien que j’accepte avec beaucoup de plaisir ces objets de la bienvaillance de la compagnie, cependant je me serais trouvé assez récompensé, si Monsieur le Bougmestre, vous même aviez cru, que mes petits efforts ont été de quelque utilité, car, dans une clamité si terrible, nos efforts ne naissent que d’un sentiment très ordinaire, c’est à dire, le devoir sacré de secourir les malheureux.
J’espére, qu’en commun avec une foule de vos concitoyens, je n’ai pas negligé cette impusion, et voila tout ce que j’ai fait, et tout le mèrite que j’en réclame.

J’ai l’honneur d’etre,
Monsieur Le Bourmeistre,
Votre très obligé et très obèisant serviteur,
Thomas Holroyd.”


Mr Holroyd was also present during the disturbances in Belgium previously to its separation from Holland in 1830 -- 31.

On the death of this Father in 1832, Mr Thomas Holroyd preceded to Calcutta, where he was employed in winding up several of the large Agency Houses which had failed about that time; and after joining the Mercantile House the became High Sheriff of Calcutta in 1837, when her Majesty Queen Victoria came to the Throne, and had the satisfaction of presiding at the Sheriff's Meeting and assigning the Addressed to Her Majesty from the Inhabitants of Ben Gaulle, and event thus reported in the Calcutta Papers of the day --

Report of the proceedings of a GENERAL MEETING of Inhabitants of Calcutta, held at the Town Hall, on the 29th September 1837, for the purpose of voting an ADDRESS to the QUEEN.

[From the Calcutta Courier.]

The Meeting at the Town Hall today was very numerously attended, but the proportion of natives was small in consequence of the holiday. We annex a copy of the Resolutions and Address.

A little after 10, the Sheriff (Mr Holroyd) appeared in the chair, and, having first allowed the half hour to elapse, he rose and addressed the Meeting to the following effect:

Gentleman,

This is the first time that I have been called upon to preside, officially as Sheriff, at a Public Meeting of my fellow citizens, and were I not supported by a consideration of the object for which it has been convened, as well as by the conviction that your proceedings this day will be characterised by the most cordial unanimity, I should feel too much embarrassment and discomposure to venture upon addressing you. In fact upon any ordinary occasion my inclinations would carry me no further than to read the Requisition; but, on an occasion of unexampled interest like the present, when we are assembled for the purpose of congratulating a youthful Queen on her accession to the throne of her ancestors, and manifesting our loyalty and attachment, I am impelled by a mingled feeling of pardonable pride and exultation to indulge the privilege, which will be conceded to all of you, of avowing my individual devotion to her royal person.

A beautiful and accomplished woman, thrown suddenly into circumstances of trial and difficulty, before maturity of years has given confidence to her judgement, is at all times an object of interest, but how intense becomes that interest, when to her other claims upon our sympathy, can be asserted the right of a Queen to our fidelity and best affections.

Here, Gentleman, we have a Sovereign, in whom youth, beauty, intelligence and moral excellence mingled their attractions, passing, at the earliest moment that the laws of her country permit her to assume the diadem, from the comparative seclusion, to which maternal solicitude and her own passion for improvement has restricted her, to the Council Chamber of mighty empire, where, though surrounded by men of the highest civil and military attendants, she has already exhibited a degree of good sense and self-possession far beyond her years.

There is an old maxim, Gentleman, which is no doubt familiar to most of you, that "where men reign, women govern," and that "where women reign, men govern." Whether the truth of this aphorism is equal to its antiquity, it is hardly worthwhile to enquire, since to all rules there is an exception, and I shall be much mistaken, Gentleman, if our most gracious Sovereign do not, ere many years elapse, furnish that exception in her own person, by becoming, no matter who her Ministers may be, the real director of their most momentous deliberations.

Educated as she has been in the expectation of filling the exalted station to which time has called her, it cannot be doubted that she will sustain the weight of empire with dignity and glory; and that under her fostering rule measures will be multiplied for diffusion of knowledge, religious and moral, and for the spread and consolidation of social and political liberty and happiness.

In the career of improvement, India too, under her auspices will, I hope, move on pari passu with the mother country, and among other means devised for ameliorating the conditions of our native fellow subjects, we may live to see the day when our sovereign’s influence may be exerted in such a way as to to lead to a more extended scheme of female education when the philanthropist may enjoy the luxury of liberating the female mind from its living tomb, and elevating it by cultivation to something like the level of the western world. But I will not longer occupy your time, Gentleman, by dwelling on anticipations of this nature, pleasing though they be. We are assembled here to offer homage to a Sovereign, who is at this time an object of intense interest to the whole civilised world, and right cordially and enthusiastically will it, I am sure be rendered.

Before I conclude, allow me to call upon the good sense of this Meeting to refrain from all political allusions of a character to disturb the harmony of the meeting. We ought all to be, and I dare say we all are, animated by one common impulse, to proffer fealty to a Queen who, whether Her Ministers be Whig or Tory, will, I am satisfied, govern both wisely and constitutionally --

"With a firm and skilful hand
May she uphold the laws, and keep them ever
Above the proud man's violence and within
The poor man's reach."

I will now, Gentleman, for form’s sake, read the Requisition, after which I shall be happy to bespeak attention for any Gentleman, who may desire to address the Meeting……………..

[This is followed by three resolutions, two of which were seconded by people with Indian names, offering congratulations to the Queen, and an Address:]

THE ADDRESS
TO THE QUEEN'S MOST EXCELLENT MAJESTY

Most Gracious Sovereign,

We, your Majesty's subjects, of all classes, residents of the Capital of British India, beg leave to tender to your Majesty our heartfelt congratulations on the occasion of your accession to the throne of your illustrious ancestors.

In the records of their private worth and public bearing, in times of warfare and in times of peace; and in the living example of the parent, who has been mercifully spared to guide your footsteps with safety and honour to the exalted station which you occupy and adorn; we discern our guarantee that what we hail, with all our best affections awakened, will prove to us, to our children, and to our country, a blessing and a pride.

Distant as we are from the object of our homage, that homage will necessarily follow, at a long interval, the welcomes of our more fortunate fellow-subjects, assembled round you; but we doubt not your Majesty will graciously accept our tribute in the spirit in which it is proffered; and, at the moment of such gracious acceptance, we would humbly invite a benignant sympathy towards the land whence we address you.

The vast extent of its varied population (comprehending eighty millions of your subjects, and forty millions of your allies and tributaries,) with the many and magnificent plans and projects, in operation, or in prospect towards their improvement; its indigenous treasures, and its commercial wealth; it's infinite capabilities, and the increasing frequency of their beneficial development; and finally, its intrinsic value, and acknowledged important to the British Ground; are no unworthy subjects of your regard. It is the land, which has enriched, by turns, the most civilised nations of the earth, and though not cherished hitherto with the warm sympathy which it merits, has maintained its vigour and resources, and shines, as it has long shone, the brightest jewel of your diadem.

The dominion, established in British India by the arms and wisdom of your ancestors, although it may not claim to be the most perfect of human institutions, has nevertheless brought prosperity and security, where anarchy and violence had rained without control; and, when we turn from the history of the past to look upon the present, we cannot but be deeply impressed with a grateful consciousness of the vast benefits which have accrued from the Union, through which we enjoy the blessings we acknowledge.

No season can be more appropriate to the expression of such sentiments, and the assertion of our attachment to the Crown and Constitution, than that of the accession of your Majesty to the seat of empire; and we nothing doubt -- Heaven seconding our prayers -- that the name of VICTORIA shall become associated in our hearts and in our annals, with all that is noble, great and dignified.

May the Almighty Disposer of all events grant that your Majesty may long remain the chosen instrument of maintaining the honour and interest of the great Empire, which it has pleased Him to commit to your sovereignty; and of preserving to the nations, which He has entrusted to your rule, their safety, their freedom, their civil rights, and their religious liberties.”

When in Calcutta Mr Holroyd was invited to accompany Sir H. Fane the then Commander-in-Chief in India to the Court and Camp of Runjeet Singh, where he was present at all the Reviews given by Runjeet Singh of his grand Army, under the Command of General Ventura, exhibiting on one occasion 100,000 Infantry, 100 Guns, and 35,000 Cavalry, (the latter under the Command of General Allard, a French Officer). After the death of Runjeet, the Seikh Army (as is well-known) crossed the Sutlege in December 1845, in great force, which resulted in the hard fought battles of Moodkee, Ferozeshuhur, and Sobraon.


Extracts from The Bengal Sporting Magazine of December, 1838.

"It was reserved for a Gentleman of Calcutta to turn out a regular drag, and astonish the Natives with noble Coachmanship. Of this Vehicle we have given a sketch which represents the Owner springing his Team up the rise leading to Kidderpore Bridge. The Vehicle represented was a regular Brighton Coach, brought out for the Owner, Thomas Holroyd Esq., by Captain Owen of the Zenobia. As soon as it was hoisted out of the Ship, and the Wheels put on, a party was made, and the Coach started with the licensed number of twelve outside passengers, five of them ladies.

The astonishment of the Baboos was prodigious; they could not comprehend the use of the two large boots, but were quite satisfied on being informed that these were the “Babakannahs,” where the English Ladies put their Children when they travel! “Wah, Inshallah,” wonderful were the exclamations."

In January 1839, Mr Holroyd left Calcutta to settle in Gloucestershire, where he held a Captain's Commission in the Yeomanry of the late Duke of Beaufort, and was a Member of his Grace’s Hunt. Unfortunately for him he became a sleeping Partner in a large Ship Building Firm at Bristol, which failing he was obliged to revisit India; the creditors sympathising with Mr Holroyd's position unanimously restored to him much valuable property, comprising Diamonds, Pictures, and Books. Mr Holroyd returned from India for the second time in 1847, and afterwards at the solicitation of an eminent Mercantile Firm proceeded to the Indian Archipelago, and travelled as far as was then permitted over the Islands of Java, Balli, Lombock, Sumbawa, Timor, Borneo, and the Celebes, cruising among those Islands for some eighteen months in 1847 -- 48, and gaining very valuable information as to their capabilities.


Appendix M (pages 42 to 43)

William Charles Chamberlain entered the Royal Navy June, 1831, as a Volunteer of the 1st Class, with Lord James Townsend, in H.M.S. Dublin. Served as Mid-shipment in “Acteon,” Lord Edward Russell, and passing out of "Excellent," Gunnery Ship, and through the R.N. College at Portsmouth, in 1840 he was appointed Mate of "Stromboli."

At the storming of Acre Mr Chamberlain evinced great coolness and judgement in steering the first Boat of the landing party through a dangerous and intricate passage, and for the conspicuous gallantry he displayed whilst leading the storming party, -- being himself the first man to surmount the Walls, he was recommended for, and obtained, his promotion to Lieutenant, 4th November 1840. After serving for short periods in "Impregnable," "Howe," "Caledonia," "Royal William," "Hyacinth," and "Volage," Lieutenant Chamberlain was appointed to the Command of "Dwarf," (tender to the Royal Yacht,) March, 1844 to February 1845, and had several times the honour of taking the Queen and Prince Consort round the Fleet at Spithead. The "Dwarf" was also employed on special Service off the coast of Island (Commander 1845).

After commanding H.M.B. Britomart and H.M.S. Cormorant, on the West Coast of Africa (Capturing Slavers), and in the Pacific, where he was for a time Senior Officer off Rio, ill-health obliged Commander Chamberlain to go on half-pay, when he visited Malta for the sake of the Climate, and acted as Private Secretary to the Governor, Sir W. Reid, G.C.B., R.E., during the first period of the War in the Crimea, but as soon as his health was sufficiently restored he sought for employment and was sent to Command "Conflict" in the Baltic towards the end of War, and was promoted out of her to Post Rank, 21st February 1856.

The failing health of his first Wife, (Eliza, eldest daughter of Captain Basil Hall R.N., the well-known traveller and writer -- see Burk’s Baronetage,) prompted him at this time to seek for the Post of Chief Constable of Lincolnshire, and there was every reason to believe that his efforts -- aided by the very flattering testimonials he obtained from Admirals Sir B. Reynolds, Sir Houston Stuart, Sir William Bowles, Sir William Martin, Fanshawe, and other Flag Officers under whom Captain Chamberlain had served -- would have been successful, when the death of his Wife caused him to withdraw from the contest, and to again seek active Service afloat.

In May 1860, he was appointed to "Racoon" for special Service on the Coast of Syria, and was thanked by Lord J. Russell for the tact and fairness with which he negotiated several vexed questions during the disturbances then existing between Turks and Christians.

In July, 1862, Captain Chamberlain Commissioned the "Resistance" (one of the first Iron Clads) at Sheerness, and whilst in Command of her in Mediterranean, in 1865, he received, by Telegram, the flattering offer, from the Duke of Somerset, First Lord of the Admiralty, of the Command of Steam Reserve at Portsmouth, which he accepted.
In 1868, Mr Corry, then First Lord, selected him for the important post of Captain Superintendent of Chatham Dockyard, the arduous duties of which office he discharged to the entire satisfaction of two successive Controllers of the Navy, and four successive First Lords, the Admiralty testifying their confidence and approval in numerous Letters, and by retaining him in office until he obtained Flag Rank in January, 1874.

He was spoken off as the probable future Controller of the Navy -- or as one of the Junior Lords, but he asked for, and obtained, the first next vacant.Dock Yard, and was appointed, by Mr Ward Hunt, (first Lord) to be Admiral Superintendent of Devonport and Keyham Yards.

Admiral Chamberlain hoisted his Flag 12 August 1875, and devoted himself with his characteristic thoroughness to his professional duties, but his health rapidly gave way under the wear and tear of official life. On the 30th January, 1876, he was struck down by Paralysis, and finally resigned his Post in June of the same year.

(Died 27th February, 1878, at Brighton, and is there buried. Her Majesty was pleased to grant his Widow apartments in Hampton Court Palace.)


Appendix N (page 43 to 44)

The Reverend James John Holroyd, of White Hall, near Colchester, Rector of Abberton, whose death was announced in our impression of last week, was born in 1800, and was the fifth son of that eminent Judge, the late Sir George Sowley Holroyd, for many years one of His Majesty’s Justices of the Court of Kings Bench. The late Mr Holroyd was educated at Harrow School, and afterwards entered Christ College, Cambridge, where he obtained a Scholarship; he took his B.A. degree in 1830, when he was Captain of the Poll, and proceeded to M.A. in 1835. He was presented to the Rectory of Abberton by the late Lord Lyndhurst, in whom as Lord Chancellor the patronage was vested, and continued the faithful Pastor of the parish for the long period of 46 years.

He was a scholar; he excelled in modern languages -- especially German; his opinions in matters of religious faith were firm, but moderate; he was a ready speaker, courteous in demeanour, and not unmindful that the office of a Clergyman ought to be filled by a gentleman. He married, in 1833, Sophia, eldest daughter of the late Samuel Tysssen, Esq, of Narbrough Hall, Norfolk, who pre-deceased him. Of a numerous family, two sons, Captain Thyssen Holroyd and Captain F. H. Graham Holroyd, and two daughters (one married to Lieutenant General Street, C.B. and the other to Lieutenant Colonel Emilius Delmé Ratcliffe of the 88th Regiment,) survive him. He died on the 3rd February, and was buried at Abberton on Tuesday last. The mourners were confined to the immediate members of the deceased’s family; but many old friends attended at the grave as a mark of respect to his memory, while several were prevented from being present. (From an Essex paper of the day.)


Appendix O (page 44)

John Alfred Street served in the 98th Regiment with the expedition to the North of China 1842 (medal,) and was present at the attack and capture of Chingkiangfoo, and at the landing before Nankin. Embarked for the Crimea 18th September 1854, as Brigade Major, 1st Brigade, 4th Division; was present at the battles of Balaclava and Inkerman, siege and fall of Sebastopol, and expedition to Kimbourn, (medal and three clasps,) Brevet Major, C.B., Sardian and Turkish Medals, and 4th Class of. Medjidie. Colonel Street then served as Military Secretary at Gibraltar to General Sir W. F. Williams, Bart, K.C.B., the Governor, until he became a Major-General, soon after which he was appointed to command the Troops in Ceylon. (From Hart’s Army List.)


Appendix P (page 44)

Tyssen Sowley Holroyd now a Brevet Major and in the Essex Militia, was formerly Captain in the Queens 34th (the Regiment which in the Peninsula at the "Aroyos dos Molinos," captured the French 34th with their drums and Drum-Major's Staff which they used for some years;) served with them at the siege and fall of Sebastopol from the 10th August, 1855, and assault of the Redan on the 8th September, (Medal and Clasps and Turkish Medal;) is also in the campaigns in 1857 -- 59, including the actions at Cawnpore on 26th, 27th and 28th (wounded) November, 1857, capture of Meeangunge, siege and capture of Lucknow, relief of Azimghur, (was staff officer of the Azimghur Column in the Winter of 1853 -- 59,) and defeat of the rebels at Bootwul, (Medal and Clasp.) Captain Holroyd subsequently exchanged into the 23rd Royal Welch Fusiliers. (From Hart’s Army List.)

Appendix Q (page 45)

Emilius C. Delmé Radcliffe served for some years in the 88th Connaught Rangers, and was in the Eastern Campaign of 1854-55, including the battle of Alma and siege of Sebastopol, (Medal and Clasps and Turkish Medal.) (From Hart’s Army List.)


Appendix R (page 45)

John Henry Graham Holroyd served in the 65th Regiment, from 1864 to 1873, when he retired. He was present with his regiment in New Zealand during the War there, and holds the Medal. He now holds a Captain’s Commission in the 6th West York Militia (From Hart’s Army List.)

END



Full name: Shaun Lampert. Living in Kent, England (in between living in the United Arab Emirates). I am English.

The connection between me and the Holroyds is on my mother's side. My great uncle is a Holroyd Tayler, grandson of Skipwith Holroyd Tayler, who married Catherine Holroyd, one of the daughters of Henry Holroyd and Lucy Franks. Henry being one of 14 siblings, of which my great uncle remembers only 9. However, one of his sons has been tracing them through military records, especially in relation to India where most of the family served. This is where George Chaplin Holroyd comes in, as he married in Hyderabad one of the Fontaine sisters (Virginie). So Henry and George Chaplin have the same parents - Sarah Chaplin and George Sowley Holroyd. George Sowley Holroyd had 6 siblings - Mary Holroyd (1771-1787), Eleanor Holroyd (1768-1828), Jane Holroyd (1764-1766), Charlotte Holroyd (1762-1794), Mildred Holroyd (1761-1762), Henry Holroyd (1760-1780). These can easily be found on LDS. George Sowley Holroyd’s parents are apparently Eleanor Sowley (1723- ) and George Sowley (1719- ). Eleanor's father being Henry and George Holroyd's father also being Henry. A piece of George Sowley's hair is apparently in the documentation left at Oxford University, see ‘Papers of Sir Charles Edward Grey (1785-1865)’ at www.bodley.ox.ac.uk/uk/dept/scwmss/

That file gives details of the Grey family and the links to the Holroyd family, and shows the positions of the individuals concerned. Sir Charles being governor of Calcutta, and George Holroyd being governor of Putna.

As for the name Jervoise, if you check out the file above and compare to LDS, you will find his wife was Elizabeth Jervoise. The name Jervoise has continued on my side, in that I have a great uncle and cousin by that name (christian), plus there was another that my great uncle knew but cannot remember the exact relationship.
As a naughty sideline, my great uncle was told that one of the Grey's (Captain) married his secretary. The Grey's remained friends of the family for many years after returning to the UK, and my great uncle knew many of them.
I am still waiting to get the paperwork of my great uncle, but like all old people he is very forgetful nowadays. So most of my correspondence on the family is via his son, Unfortunately he lives away, like me most of the time.

Your book sounds fascinating [it turned into Dropbox, ARJ], and I would be pleased to read it. Talking of books, I gave a book to my mother on the Indian revolt, I'll get the name later this week, but there is a short passage in it on how Skipwith Tayler's father, William, and Charles Grey were involved in the insurrection. Most of the blame landed on William Tayler's shoulders and he was discredited in parliament. I'm told but have not yet found it, that there is a website detailing the parliamentary proceedings. If you want more details on the 14 sibling Holroyds, I will be happy to send what I have. And I will continue to contact my cousin (an army officer), to see if there is any more that he has found. That's all for now, I hope I may have given you a little information, and thanks for yours.
Yours Aye
Shaun
Biography
From "The Chaplin and Skinner Families" December 1902 (pages 4 to 6):

>> There were fourteen children of this marriage, namely:-
(1) MARY ANNE, born 31st December, 1788, and died 14th May, 1813.
Married Captain Charles Court, but left no children.
(2) GEORGE CHAPLIN HOLROYD, born 9th September, 1790, and died 24th November, 1871. He had six children, of whom the second was His Honour Henry Holroyd, County Court Judge, who died on the 11th January, 1896.
(3) CHARLES HOLROYD, born 31st January, 1792, and died without issue
on 13th September, 1830
(4) HENRY AMOS HOLROYD, horn 24th May, 1793 and died 23rd February, 1794.
(5) EDWARD HOLROYD, born 24th July, 1794, and died 29th January, 1881. .He was a barrister, and was subsequently appointed Senior Commissioner of the Bankruptcy Court in London. He had six children, of whom Edward Dundas Holroyd, Q.C., who now lives at Melboume, and is a Judge of the Supreme Court of Victoria, is one.
(6) SARAH LOUISA, born 4th July, 1796, and died 11th January, 1876.
(7) FREDERICK COURT, born 28th November, 1797, and died in infancy.
(8) THOMAS HOLROYD, born 23rd March, 1799, and died at Hampton Court Palace on 27th November, 1893, at the ageof 94, leaving a daughter, Sarah Morgan Chamberlain, widow of the late Rear Admiral William Charles Chamberlain, R.N.
(9) JAMES JOHN HOLROYD, born 28th September, 1800, died 3rd February, 1876, having had nine children.
(10) WILLIAM JAMES HOLROYD, born 20th August, 1802 and died 6th March, 1803
(11) HENRY HOLROYD, born 5th April, 1804, and died 29th September, 1859, leaving four children.
(12) SARAH MARIA, born 26th May, 1805 and died 3rd August, 1815.
(13) CHARLOTTE, born 8th September, 1806, and died 30th June, 1811.
(14) FREDERIC HOLROYD, born 14th March, 1810, died 29th June, 1811.

Mr. Justice Holroyd, after sitting on the Bench for twelve years, resigned his office on I7th November, 1828; he died on 21st November, 1831, and was buried at Wargrave; and the following epitaph, written by his friend Lord Brougham, was engraved on the monument erected in Wargrave Church by his son Thomas Holroyd:--

"Sacred to the Memory of Sir George Sowley Holroyd, Kt., one of the Justices of the Court of King's Bench:
A lawyer to be ranked high among the greatest of any age; endowed with an original genius to enlarge the bounds of any science, but peculiarly adapted to that which he pursued: a counsellor sure, faithful, and sagacious; an advocate learned, ready, skilful, correct; a judge upright, firm, patient, humane; of a gentle nature, serene temper, simple and kindly manners; but of principles pure, lofty, inflexible; he was not more honoured in his public capacity than beloved on all the private relations of his blameless life.

Born xxxi October, MDCCLVIII.
Married x September, MDCCLXXXVII
Raised to the Bench xiv February, MDCCCXVI
Resigned xvii November, MDCCCXXVIII.
Died xxi November, MDCCCXXXI"

Lady Holroyd died on the 11th November, 1848, at Exmouth, in her 81st year, and was buried with her husband at Wargrave.

(2) The Rev. Edward Chaplin (see below)<<


In Effie Irene Pearce's red covered photo album/scrapbook a cutting from The Times gives an extract from the paper a century before - on Monday 11 November, 1822 - which mentions Mr Justice Holroyd as one of the guests at the Dinner at Guildhall "The customary feast upon the Chief Magistrate's accession was given at Guildhall on Saturday (Lord Mayor's Day). The preparations and appointments were in the usual style and taste. The Hall, in which the chief guests sat, was illuminated with gas......."

END George Sowley Holroyd

From The Dictionary of National Biography

(He) owes his origin to the same stirps from which Lord Sheffield descended; the direct ancestors of both, George and Isaac, being the sons of Isaac Holroyd, of Crawcrofte in Rishworth, in the parish of Elland in the county of York. The judge was the great-grandson of George, and the eldest son of another George, by Eleanor, the daughter of Henry Sowley, of Appleby, Esq. He was born at York on October 31, 1758, and was sent to


but, in consequence of his father suffering some severe losses from unfortunate speculations, he was removed from Harrow, and in April 1774 was articled to Mr. Borthwick, an attorney in London. At the end of three years, he entered Gray’s Inn, and commenced business as a special pleader in April 1779.

During the eight years that he pursued this branch of the profession, he adopted, with Romilly, Christian, and Baynes, one of the most effective preparations for the contests into which they were about to enter. Meeting at each other’s chambers, they discussed legal points previously arranged, one of them taking the affirmative side, another supporting the contrary part, and a third summing up the arguments and deciding the question as judge. On June 26, 1787, he was called to the bar, and about three months after married Sarah, the daughter of Amos Chaplin, Esq., who brought him fourteen children.

He joined the Northern Circuit, and the character he had acquired while under the bar of solidity of judgement and professional ability secured to him a fair proportion of business, both in the north and in Westminster Hall. Ere he had been called a year his name appears in two cases in the ‘Term Reports.’ (ii.445, 480.) During the twenty nine years that he remained at the bar his fee-book shows the rapid increase of his practice, proving also the advance of his reputation by the number and importance of the cases submitted to his direction. Of a retiring disposition, he persisted in declining the offer of a silk gown, and therefore his merits were comparatively unrecognised by the general public; but among the legal community his superiority was fully acknowledged, and it was said of him that ‘he was absolutely born with a genius for law.’ So highly were his instructions esteemed that, while at the bar, no less than forty-seven pupils availed themselves of them, among whom were Mr Baron Bullock, Mr Baron Bolland, and Mr Justice Cresswell. In 1811 he greatly distinguished himself in the celebrated case of privilege, Burdett v The Speaker of the House of Commons, by his luminous arguments on behalf of the plaintiff. (14 East’s Reports, 11.) In the last year of his pracice at the bar he was sent by the government to Guernsey, at the head of a commission to enquire into and determine certain ‘doleances’ complained of by persons resident in that island.

At length he was appointed a judge of the King’s Bench. In that court he sat for more than twelve years, from February 14, 1816, to November 17, 1828, the date of his resignation, fully sustaining the reputation he had acquired, and largely con


sociated with such erudite and discriminating judges as Lord Tenterden, Sir John Bayley, and Sir Joseph Littledale. His patience never seemed to be wearied; his decisions were always clear and well-founded, for his memory was the storehouse of all the arguments that had ever been advanced for or against the case he was to judge; and his taste, with no effort at display, was so exquisite that he made the driest subjects interesting. The infirmities which obliged him to retire, in three years terminated his life, on November 21, 1831, at his residence at Hare Hatch in Berkshire. A monument is erected to his memory in the parish chrch of Wargrave, with an inscription, written by Lord Brougham, faithfully and eloquently describing his merits and his virtues.

Of the judge’s fourteen children six survived him, one of whom exercised as a commissioner of the Court of Bankruptcy till the recent alteration of that court the functions of his laborious office with the same legal learning, the same patience, and the same suavity of temper that distinguished his father.

End
Extracts from a booklet with a blue cover, in very poor condition, with a handwritten note on the cover indicating that it was given to Holroyd Chaplin on 8 February 1882 (or was it 1881?).
See Family Tree Maker – Holroyd entries.


A Branch of the Holroyd Family

A letter pasted inside the cover reads:

Wimbledon
Monday night, 8th February 1881

My dear Holroyd,

I enclose your the ‘Branch of the Holroyd Family’ as promised but recollect, "keep it dark’ for I have a great horror of appearing to blow my own trumpet!! Nor would I have put in any thing about self if Edward Dundas had not wished it.

Yours very ..
T.H.

Page 3:

TO EDWARD DUNDAS HOLROYD, ESQ., QC
AT MELBOURNE, IN THE COLONY OF VICTORIA.


Wimbledon, August 1879

My dear Edward,

Having resided, like yourself, for many years in the East, I can quite understand your desire to preserve the remembrance of your elder English relatives, and to know something of the generation which has arisen since you quitted the old country. I have endeavoured to assist you by drawing up a short sketch of the history of the family, and collecting a few particulars which seemed to me worthy of being recorded, concerning several of its members. At your request, I have introduced some incidents of my own life, which I should otherwise have omitted. I trust the pamphlet may prove useful as a family and chronicle, and may enable you to transmit some interesting memorials to your descendants in Australia.

I can,
My dear Edward,
Your very affectionate Uncle,
Thomas Holroyd

Page 4: Is blank

Pages 5 to 13: Are incorporated in the Family Tree file so are not repeated here. See Sir George Sowley Holroyd (born 31 October 1758) in that file, his children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren]


Appendix A (pages 14 to 18)

MR JUSTICE HOLROYD BY LORD BROUGHAM
Extract from " The Edinburgh Review," 1839.

Mr Justice Holroyd was one of the most able, most learned, and most virtuous men that ever in any age adorned the profession of the Law. Endowed with feeble spirits, and having never cultivated the gifts of fancy, and probably not possessing any range of imagination, he chose for his study the severer branches of forensic exertion; and by assiduous labour long bestowed upon that dry study, became possessed of all the knowledge of our jurisprudence which industry can acquire, and the greatest natural sagacity marshall. Until the Practice is added to the study of the law, the most diligent student cannot be said to have made himself a good a lawyer; nor can he even ascertain whether or not he is destined ever to attain that eminence. After he began to plead below the bar, which is the particular branch of the profession that tends more directly than any other to unfold and to improve the faculties leading to this most desirable station, he soon became known for the conscientious application of his powers and his knowledge to the business he was entrusted with; and both his pupils benefited largely by his instructions, and his clients were comforted with a full and ready assistance in all their difficulties. When he had obtained considerable reputation in this walk, he entered Westminster Hall; and soon rose to the first eminence upon that great circuit which distributes the streams of justice from the centre of the judicial system, through the vast counties of York and Lancaster, and the four northern provinces.

It was soon found that this distinguished person was far indeed from being a mere special pleader. He possessed a clearness and quickness of apprehension, a vigour and firmness of understanding, a just and becoming confidence in his own opinion, that shone through his natural modesty -- a modesty singularly graceful, and allied to a most amiable and gentle nature, which neither the contentions of the forum could roughen, nor the severest of studies harden. To whatever branch of investigation he had devoted his life, in that he would have eminently excelled; and as in the stricter sciences he would have been a great discover, so he might be truly said to have a genius for law.

His views were profound, and they were original. He saw points in a light that was unexpected and felicitous. But he reasoned, and he decided upon no affected conceits, such as Westminster Hall turns crotchets, or fancies, or whims. His admirable judgement always maintained its sway; and his opinion upon all matters submitted to him was still more remarkable for being sound then his reasonings were for being learned and ingenious. A result of all this great merit, which did more honour to him than to the other branch of his profession, was, that although no one enjoyed so high a legal reputation, few gained their professional income with harder labour. Whenever a difficult and important question arose, Mr Holroyd's opinion was eagerly sought upon all the cases which grew out of it, or became connected with it; and when ordinary matters of easy solution came into dispute, or where opinions upon questions of course were to be taken in point form, or where causes were coming into court of which anyone could settle the pleadings, or conduct the minor departments of the suit after it came into court, others were selected to perform the easy, every-day, lucrative work; the love of a little patronage operating on the attorney's mind more than a sense of justice. Nothing was more common, therefore, than to see this great lawyer answer eight or ten questions upon the construction of a cramp and obscure will, or the course of action fit to be pursued in seeking for the establishment of complicated rights; or the course of pleading most safe in defending nice positions; while ordinary men were in the same time reaping the golden harvest of ordinary business, presenting no kind of difficulty, and level to the most humble capacity.

In Court, he of course shone less than in Chambers. His figure was low, but his voice was pleasing; until interrupted by an affection of the trachea, which gave him a kind of constant cough for many years, and at last terminated his valuable life. His delivery was, if not striking or commanding, perfectly correct and natural. His style of argument was of the very highest order, although somewhat less venturous in topics than it ought to have been with so great and jurisconsult, or rather steering too near the defined and bold coast of authority. But his language was choice; his order lucid; his argumention close; his discussion of cases, and his application of them, masterly; -- showing an easy familiarity with all principles and all points, whether recondite or of common occurrence; and a profound judgement in weighing differences and resemblances, and tracing analogies and consequences, which was in vain sought for elsewhere. His famous argument in the case of Parliamentary Privilege (See Burdett v. Abbot, East 14) is truly a masterpiece. The history of the law is there traced through the stream of cases with a superior hand, while the bearings of all authority in favour of the argument are given, with a felicity only equalled by the dexterity with which the adverse cases are got rid of, and their force dissipated. The taste, withal, considering the exciting nature of the subject, is throughout severely chaste; nor can the most fastidious critic descry a spot whereon to fix for blame; while the most zealous enemy of Parliamentary oppression cannot find any ground for complaint in the strenuous exertions of the advocate. Arguments like these at once control the judge, as if they came from a higher authority; edify the party in whose cause they are urged; diffuse the useful light of information among the profession; and conserve pure and untainted the most refined taste in composition.

Although the habits of this illustrious lawyer did not often place him, and never voluntarily, in the position of a leader, it yet would occasionally happen that he might conduct some cause of importance before a jury; and then his admirable judgement, ready knowledge of his subject, and all its legal relations, correct taste, and inimitable suavity of temper, united all voices in his praise. His arrangement of the subject, and his diction, were alike perfect; what he wanted in the vigour of declamation, to which he made no pretention, was amply supplied by the combined force of his reasoning and by his luminous statement of facts; nor was he ever engaged in causes which demanded resources of wit or of pathos, the only portions of the rhetorical art to which he neither laid any claim, nor could find substitutes in his own proper stores.

In his conduct at the bar, whether at consultation or in court, whether as a leader or a junior and pleader, he was perfect. No man was more respectful to his leaders when a junior; none less assuming when he led. But tho’ never wanting in courtesy, whichever station he filled, he never failed firmly to assert his own opinion, whether as to the law of the case or the discretion of conducting it, when he had a leader; nor to act with the entire resolution that belonged to his responsible position when he led himself. In every instance however, the cause and the client were observed to be his sole object. To advance them was always his aim; to put himself forward, never. The most happy illustrations, the most sound legal topics, were suggested by him quietly, almost secretly, to his leader; from whose far less learned lips came forth, as if they had been his own, the sense of Mr Holroyd; who, so far from giving the least indication of the sources whence the point had come, only said a word in its support when absolute necessity required.

Having long adorned the bar, he was raised to the bench, chiefly, it was believed, through the exertions of Lord Ellenborough, who had known him intimately, and has always felt for him unbounded respect and esteem. As a Judge, he fully sustained the high character which he carried with him from the forum. When he sat at Nisi Prius, it was delightful see the familiar ease with which he handled all points that could be made before him, come they ever so unexpectedly upon him, or be they ever so much out of the everyday course of business. The manner, too, in which he dealt with them attracted a special admiration "Sir," said Mr Sergeant Hullock, captivated with this, "he is like one of the old men, the great fountains of our law." "But with a good sense and a just taste, rather belonging to our age than to theirs," -- was the proper and correct addition of one to whom the Sergeant's remark had been addressed.

The only defect which anyone could charge on his judicial performances, was that from which it is so difficult for anyone to be free who has been raised to the bench from behind the bar, and without the experience of leading causes. He cannot well take the larger and more commanding view of cases, which the leader naturally adopts, and to which he confines himself rather than details. Hence, at least before experiencing of trying many causes has lent such lawyers expertness, they feel some difficulty in grappling with larger and complicated cases; are apt to lose themselves in particulars; and are found unable to dispose of more than a very limited number of causes, however well they may try those which they are able to dispatch. To this remark Mr Justice Holroyd formed no exception. While no man tried a great case better, few so well, he would suffer a heavy cause paper to fall into arreer, from not aportioning his labour justly amongst the more important and more trivial matters. Indeed, except Lord Tenterden, and one or two of the latter judges raised to the bench before the habits of the pleader had been formed, there are hardly to be found any exceptions to rule which we have stated, as deduced from long experience of the profession.

Than this eminent and excellent person, no man was more beloved of in private life, or could be more justly prized in all its relations. Of the strictest integrity, of unsullied professional honour, of the most sweet and equal temper, whether amidst the cares of private life (nor was he unacquainted with both its sorrows and difficulties), or in the discharge of his public duties as a magistrate, exposed to the wranglings of the bar, or in the part which he so long took as an advocate among all the contentions of the forum, his good-humour was constant and unruffled; so much so, that it seemed to cost him no effort at all either to exercise unwearied patience on the bench, or to command his suavity of temper at the bar. Of his valuable arguments, and of his learned and luminous judgments, the monuments remain in the "Term Reports" for the last thirty years of his life; of his eminently expressive countenance, at once sagacious, thoughtful, and mild, the likeness remains in Reynolds’ portrait and print. It is only speaking this sense of all Westminster Hall to add, that, as his loss was deeply felt by the profession, so it will be very long indeed, in all probability, before such a great luminary of the law shall arise to shed a light over its dark precincts, and to exalt the glory of the bar (See also Foss’s Lives of the Judges.)

Copied from a Poem called "The Bar."
In solid worth and lending near akin,
Rough as two pines without, as sweet within,
HOLROYD with mind like glass without a flaw,
And Wood* a neat compendium of the Law.
Fashioned with feet of clay -- but head of gold,
A compound image he, like that of old,
True as the season came, "paired off" from town,
And here in friendly union posted down.
So as he is sung in verse or prose,
Brentford’s two kings marched, smelling at one rose.

*Mr Justice Holroyd and Mr. Baron Wood

The following Epitaph written by Lord Brougham was engraved on the Monument erected in Wargrave Church by his Son Thomas Holroyd.

[For the Epitaph itself see Family Tree, Notes on George Sowley Holroyd]


Appendix B (pages 19 to 21)

On the Monument at Calcutta
Sacred to the Memory of
MARY ANNE, Wife of Captain Charles Court, Marine Surveyor-General, and Eldest Daughter of George Sowley Holroyd, Esq., Barrister of Gray's Inn Inn, who departed this life on the
14th May, 1813, aged 24 years.

If worth were to be estimated by the unspeakable grief of a disconsolate Husband, and the deep and unfeigned regret of all who had the happiness of her acquaintance, hers would rank high indeed, but, alas! she has fled from erring judgement to that Tribunal which alone can duly appreciate the mild and gentle virtues which adorned her amiable mind.


Extract -- "Madras Government Gazette," the 18th October, 1821

On Sunday, the ninth of September, about half past four o'clock, at his home at Ballygunge, departed this life Captain Charles Court, of the Honourable Companiy's Bombay Marine Establishment, and Marine Surveyor-General of India; and on the following day his remains were removed under a discharge of Minute Guns from the Honourable Company's Surveying Ship "Meriton," and were received and escorted to the place of Internment by a large Detachment of His Majesty's 87th Regiment, Commanded by Lieutenant-Colonel Shaw, CB, and interred with the Military Honours due to his rank.

The early services of the beloved and lamented Officer in question, are best described by the following testimony borne to his merits by the able and justly respected late Superintendent of the Bombay Marine, W. T. Money, Esq (now one of the Honourable Court of Directors,) in his address to that Government under date of the 15th July, 1809.

"Upon this occasion, Honourable Sir, I have to discharge a very pleasing part of my duty in bringing to your notice the services and merits of a very respectable Officer.

Lieutenant Court after acquiring a knowledge of his profession in the East India Service was appointed to the Honourable Company's Marine in the year 1790, and served as second Lieutenant of the "Panther" on a cursory Survey of the Red Sea, under Lieutenant White, and in the same station on board the Bombay Frigate "Commodore Picket," he was actively engaged in the reduction of Colombo and its dependencies.

As first Lieutenant of the same ship he gallantly served at the reduction of Manado on Celebes, and was appointed to the Command of Fort Amsterdam, which he held for nine months under the most critical circumstances, in a hostile country. In reward of his distinguished merits in this trying situation, he was appointed President at Manado and Commandant of all the British Troops on Celebes.

During the period of his Command in this important post which he held for seven years he completely succeeded in consiliating the vast population of that valuable Island, and attaching all ranks to the British Government; having by the personal influence which his own conduct had acquired for him, accomplished a treaty with all the chiefs by which very considerable advantages were secured to the Honourable Company, and many barbarous customs, which tended to render the people, naturally mild and offensive, cruel and vindictive, were solemnly abandoned.

Had peace not restored to the Dutch their possessions to the Eastward, Manado would have been rendered by Mr Court's prosperous administration a valuable acquisition to the East India Company.

Upon the restoration of the Malaccas Lieutenant Court returned to the active duties of his profession, and in Command of the "Princess Augusta" with a small squadron he blockaded Severndroog where he captured 36 vessels, seven of the largest of which he cut from under the guns of the fort, and obtained restitution of a Dow laden with Company's coffee to a considerable amount.

From this Station he was recalled and selected to command the Honourable Company’s Ship "Ternate" in pursuit of "La Fortune," "Monsieur La Meme," who had recently captured the "Fly" but upon his arrival at Bombay he found that the enemy was a prize to his Majesty's Ship "Concorde."

Lieutenant Court was then, at particular request, appointed to Command of the "Panther," and proceeded with Lord Valentia to the Red Sea where he prosecuted a tedious, an arduous, and a difficult survey of the Abyssinian Coast with great credit to himself and perfect satisfaction to his Lordship.

Soon after his return to Bombay in 1807, he was selected to be my Assistant, and from his attention, assiduity, and ability, I have derived such valuable aid in the discharge of my public duties, that I part from Mr Court's services with the utmost regret, and shall ever hold them in thankful remembrance."

Captain Court, while in England, married one of the daughters of the present Sir George Holroyd, a young lady whose personal attractions were only surpassed by her unassuming virtues and superior mental attainment is.

In the year 1810, Captain Court was appointed by the Honourable Court of Directors Marine Surveyor-General of India, for which important office his superior abilities rendered him particularly qualified, and he arrived at Calcutta in the following year.

In the year 1813, he had the misfortune to lose his inestimable Partner, and from that period to the day of the termination of his own earthly career he shrunk from the world's observation, and never regained the wonted serenity of his mind nor the vigour of his faculties.

The above inadequate sketch of the virtues and worth of the deceased are humbly recorded as an unfeigned tribute of affectionate regard for his memory, by those who revered him while living and who will never cease to deplore his loss. Calcutta Journal.


Appendix C (pages 21 to 25)

Account of the Action of the 3rd July 1810, between the Ceylon, Windham, and Astell, East Indiamen, and two large French Frigates and a Corvette; copied from the Log of the Honourable C. S. Astell, by George Chaplain Holroyd [who was a Cadet on board].

At daylight three strange sail in sight bearing N.E. close hauled on the larboard tack. Called the hands out, beat to quarters, and cleared ship for action. At four minutes past seven signalled to prepare for battle, shortened sale, Commodore (Ceylon) under top sails;
7.18 Signal to keep in the Commodore wake, bore up to get in the Commodore wake;
7.30 Signal to haul the wind on the starboard tack;
7.35 Land bearing E. half N, the three strangers on the larboard tack bearing N.E by N. distant seven miles;
8.20 Ceylon made the private signal;
8.35 Signal to number strange sale seen;
8.40 Signal to wait the attack of the enemy;
8.45 Signal that the strangers are enemies;
9.16 Two of the strangers were bearing W.by N. distant six or seven miles; it
9.30 The third stranger wore and loosed top gallant sails;
9.55 Blowing fresh, took in main top gallant sail, and made signal to Ceylon that we were over-pressed with sail and not able to keep company on that account;
10.15 Signal to continue our course under easy sail;
10.35 Took in main sail;
10.37 The Commodore telegraphed.........[set of numbers]
11.15 In third reefs blowing;
11.25 The Windham telegraphed the Commodore, .... [set of numbers]
12.00 Two of the strangers astern on the starboard tack coming up, the smallest a Corvette, about three miles distant, carrying 22 guns, reconnoitring the fleet, the other six or seven astern a very heavy frigate, and the third stranger bearing N.by E., nine or 10 miles, to appearance a frigate of the same description;
12.10 The Ceylon telegraphed in the following numbers....[set of numbers]
12.30 The Ceylon bore up to come near us, at the same time the Corvette about one mile distance wore to join the frigate that was astern, the frigate about five miles off;
12.35 Signal to hoist same covers as the Commodore with a pendant;
1.05 The Corvette, three or four miles astern, wore again;
1.15 The frigate, on the starboard tack, bearing N.E. half N. nine or 10 miles distant, tacked and stood towards us under all sail;
1.30 The Commodore hoisted the red ensign and pendant, which we did also, the largest Frigate and Corvette nearly two miles astern;
1.45 The Ceylon made signal to keep in close order closing towards the leading ship or van;
1.55 The Frigates on the larboard tack bearing N. N. E. hoisted English colours, and when she bore S.S.W. tacked again to join her Consort
2.10 The largest Frigate and Corvette, on our weather quarter, distant half a mile. The Frigate, after firing a gun to leeward, hoisted French colours, and immediately opened fire upon us (the Ceylon and Windham ahead), which we returned, and continued in close action. The Commodore and Wyndham firing upon her at the same time;
3.00 The Corvette came into action, bore up under our stern, and raked us, and took her station on our lee quarter, returned her fire with our after larboard guns;
3.15 The Corvette bore up to get without reach of our shot, we still continuing closely engaged with the frigate. The Ceylon and Wyndham still ahead, the Ceylon engaged and the Wyndham firing as her guns would bear;
3.30 The red ensign was shot away and gaff brought down, hoisted the blue ensign;
3.40 Captain Hay was carried off the quarter deck severely wounded in the thigh.
4.15 The Ceylon dropped between us and the enemy, and kept up a spirited fire. Ceased firing and backed the main top sail to get clear of her, when we renewed the action. The Frigate then made more sail, and shot ahead firing into the Ceylon and Windham as she passed, directing most of her fire on the Wyndham, and after engaging her for a short time and getting a little ahead of her, the Frigate wore right athwart our bows; bore up with the intend to board, but could not affect it, she having too much way. When about half a ships' length from us we poured a broadside and commenced a spirited fire of musquetry fore and aft, which completely cleared her upper deck and silenced her. She then hauled her wind on the larboard tack and engaged the Ceylon as she passed. When astern of the Ceylon, the Frigate tacked, and in stays her main and mizen top masts went over the side. As soon as we saw this, hove all aback with the intention of boarding her a second time, but the Commodore and Windham drawing ahead as we thought with a view of diverting the attention of the Frigate that had not been in action and also the Corvette from the disabled one, and of concentrating the whole of our force against her, filled again to get into our station and when abreast of the Commodore gave him three cheers, which he returned and got into our station astern and got all ready to renew the action with the fresh Frigare. She, instead of going to the assistance of her consort, made sail.
5.45 We being the sternmost ship, brought us to close action, pouring in a heavy fire of round and grape shot, and also from musquetry and swivels in her top, which we returned and continued for nearly an hour closely engaged, the Commodore and Windham a little ahead keeping up a heavy fire on the enemy as they could bring their guns to bear, the Corvette on our starboard quarter keeping up a cross fire at us.
6.45 The Frigate shot ahead of us, ceased our fire when she was abreast of the Ceylon, and after engaging her a short time closely, the Ceylon bore up, as we supposed, with the intention of boarding her, bore up to support her. The Ceylon passed under the Frigates' stern, and observing she did not fire we luffed up under his lee quarter and asked him what were his intentions, he replied that he had struck to the Frigate, that Captain Minton and his chief officer were shot, and the ship completely disabled, to continue the contest longer would be sacrificing lives to no purpose; the Frigate was then a short gunshot from us on our starboard bow, and the Windham about a mile astern. Our ship being completely crippled in masts, yards, rigging, and sails, many guns being rendered useless by the long continuance of the action, and making three feet water per hour;
7.20 Put our helm up and stood to the westward. The Frigate perceiving this again opened a tremendous fire upon us, which we returned as long as we were within shot. When without gun shot ceased firing and stood to the Nd and Wd.
7.50 Two of the enemy in chase;
8.00 The enemy gained on us; got the ship in as great state of readiness as circumstances would admit, to defend her to the last extremity, and threw the Honourable Company's dispatches over-board.


Memo: George Chaplin Holroyd was appointed Captain of two guns on the gun deck, exactly opposite the main mast, which the sailors turn the slaughterhouse, a very honourable station. A ball came through the side of the ship, the splinters knocked him down senseless for a few moments, he got a cut on his forehead over his left eye, and a small one close under his eye. After five hours closer action, being favoured by the darkness of the night, the Astell got off and arrived at Madras on the 1st August, 1810. It is very remarkable that this action happened on the Cambridge Commemoration Day; at that time last year George Chaplin Holroyd was feasting most sumptuously in Trinity Hall. E.H.

The result of the Action was the Capture of the Ceylon and Windham and escape of the Astell.

Copy of the certificate sent in by the Commander of the "pastel," to General St. Leger, which was not published at the time, as that Officer did not forwarded to Government.

I do hereby certify that the undermentioned Gentleman Cadets, who were on board of the Astell in the action of the 3rd July, behaved on that occasion with the most exemplary gallantry, and contributed as much as lay in their power to the defence of the ship. Being an eye-witness to their youthful ardour and undaunted intrepidity, I am confident they will prove shining ornaments to the honourable profession which they have embraced, and I cannot refrain from expressing my high admiration of their correct moral conduct and gentlemanly deportment doing the passage from England.

Where the conduct of all is so deserving of encomium, it may appear invidious to select individual merit, but I am irresistibly led to mention a circumstance that redounds to the honour of Mr G. Holroyd. This gentleman having the command of a gun on the main deck, four men belonging to it were disabled at the same moment, and himself wounded in the face. The remaining four (foreigners) were seized with a panic, and quitted their quarters, but Mr Holroyd instantly brought them back, and under his animated example the gun was fought during the remainder of the action with the greatest ardour and bravery.
Signed: Robert Hay, Commander [this followed by the names of the Gentlemen Cadets].

An interesting and full account of this gallant action may be found in James's Naval History, Vol 5, p. 262, from which it appears that the East India Company presented each of the Captains with the sum of £500 and bestowed a handsome remuneration upon the remaining Officers and Men. A pension of £460 a year was settled on Captain Hay of the Astell, who was desperately wounded, and £2000 presented to the Officers and Crew. The colours of the Astell were three times shot away; Andrew Peters, one of the seamen nailed the pendant to the main top mast head, and was killed as he descended the rigging.


Appendix D (page 25)

George Holroyd entered the East India Company's Military Service 1st March, 1838, and became Colonel 1st March, 1869, he served throughout the operations of the Candahar force in 1838 -- 42, (wounded at Barree Raban, 15th September, 1842), including the advance on Ghuznee and Cabul, and taking of Istaliff (Medal) Gwalior Campaign, and present at the battle of Maharajpore (Bronze Star) Sutlege Campaign of 1845 -- 46, including the battle of Sobraon, horse shot (Medal). (From Hart's Army List)


Appendix E (page 25)

Henry Holroyd was admitted a Member of the Middle Temple in November, 1844, and practiced as a special pleader under the Bar. He was called to the Bar 1853, and went the Oxford Circuit and Lichfield and Stafford Sessions. He reported for some years for the Law Journal, and has since given his services to the Incorporated Council of Law Reporting for England and Wales. He was made a County Court Judge 27 May 1880 by Lord Selbourne -- the Lord Chancellor.


Appendix F (page 26)

Charles Holroyd entered the Military Service of the East India Company on the 11th June, 1839, and retired as a Major-General on the 23rd January, 1875. While in India he was employed most of the time on the Staff in Assam. In the Mutiny in 1857 he received the heartfelt facts of the Europeans resident in Assam, as the following inscription on the Testimonial they presented to him will bear witness.

Presented to
CAPTAIN CHARLES HOLROYD,
Principal Assistant Commissioner, Seebsaugur, Upper Assam,
by the Tea Planters of his District,
in testimony of their high appreciation of the untiring energy, Zeal, and
courage displayed by him during the alarming crisis in 1857,
to whose forethought and skilful arrangements in unravelling the plot
of the Mutineers to massacre all the Europeans in the Province,
they entirely attribute the safety of their lives,
and the preservation of their property.

The above inscription was engraved on a very handsome large silver salver, and presented to Captain Holroyd by the Tea Planters; the Government, however, would not allow him too accept it, and Planters, therefore, sent it to England to his Brother, Henry Holroyd, Barrister-at-Law, with a request that he would presented to his Brother on his retirement from the Service.


Appendix G (page 26)

Henry Mills entered the Military Service of the East India Company, 20th October, 1840, and became a Major-General on the 12th August, 1876. He served in the Campaign of 1840 in Afghanistan with the force under General Nott, and was present in the various actions from Candahar to Peshawar (Medal), Gwalior Campaign, and present at the battle of Maharajpore, 29th December 1843, (Bronze Star), Sutlege Campaign in 1845 -- 46 -- including the battles of Moodkee and Ferozeshah, where his horse was wounded (Medal and Clasp). During the Mutiny in 1857, employed in moving troops to the Front (From Harts Army List.)


Appendix H (page 27)

Edward Holroyd practised as a Special Pleader for seven years under the Bar, having a large business and ten pupils, some of whom became eminent, including Sir David Dundas, afterwards Solicitor-General. He was called to the Bar on the 26 April 1826; in November, 1828, he was appointed by Lord Lyndhurst one of the Commissioners of Bankrupts under the old system, and on the 21st October, 1831, he was appointed by Lord Brougham a Commissioner of the Bankruptcy Court then established, and held the position of Senior Commissioner on the abolition of the Court in December, 1869, having been in office longer than any Judge then on the Bench. On his retirement he was thanked by the Bar and the Solicitors of his Court for his unvarying courtesy and kindness while sitting as a Judge.

Appendix I (page 27)

George Frederic Holroyd was sent to Winchester College as a Commoner in February, 1837. While at Winchester he gained the second Heathcote prize, and also the Duncan prize for Mathematics on its first institution, as well as other prizes. He was entered at Trinity College, Cambridge where he went to reside in October, 1842. In January, 1846, he graduated B.A. a Wrangler and second class in the Classical Tripos, and M.A. in 1849. Whilst at Cambridge he was distinguished as one of the best oarsmen of the Trinity Boat Club, rowed stroke at the head of the River for a year, and number two in the University Crew of 1845, who were victorious. He also rowed in other successful Matches, particularly at the Thames Regatta, when a four-ordered Crew of the T.B.C. defeated the Oxford University four. He passed an examination in Hebrew after he had taken his degree, and continued at Cambridge for some years taking pupils. In 1865 he came forward as a Candidate for the representation of the Town of Northampton in Parliament, at the invitation of the Conservatives, and though defeated succeeded in polling a larger number of votes than any Conservative Candidate had previously obtained. He was called to the Bar at the Inner Temple in Hilary Term, 1873, and devoted himself to Parliamentary practice. His career at the Bar, commenced so late in life, but already full of promise, was cut short by his sudden death in 1874. He was a Magistrate for the County of Northampton, and held a Lieutenant's Commission in the Militia for that County.

Appendix J (page 28)

Edward Dundas Holroyd was educated at Winchester College, which he entered as a Commoner in February, 1841. He obtained several prizes, amongst others Bishop Maltby's prize for speaking, competed for by boys below the sixth form, the second Heathcote, and the Duncan; and carried off in two consecutive years (1845, 1846) the Queen's Gold Medal for the best Latin and English prose essays. In July, 1846, he left Winchester and proceeded in October of the same year to Trinity College, Cambridge, graduated B.A. in January 1851, (having lost a year through illness), and was in the first class of the classical tripos; he took the degree of M.A. in 1854. He was called to the Bar at Gray's Inn, on the 6th June 1855, and on the 27 July, 1859, was admitted to practice as a Barrister in the Supreme Court of Victoria, and subsequently became a Member of the Bar of Tasmania. In 1872 he was offered an appointment as one of the Judges of the Supreme Court of the Colony of Victoria, but declined it, and on the 14th January, 1879, he was appointed a Q.C. in Victoria.

The Reverend T. Compton was Great Grandson of Henry, Lord Bishop of London 1675 to 1712, sixth Son of second Earl of Northampton. He officiated for the Archbishop at the Coronation of William and Mary. (See Burke.)


Appendix K (page 28 to 33)

Statement of Service of Major W.R.M. Holroyd, Bengal Staff Corps.

Service in the Field

Served in the Central India Field Force (under Sir Hugh Rose) with H.M.'s 86th Regiment during the campaign of 1857 -- 58. Present at the siege and capture of Chanderi, the siege and capture of Jhansi, the battle of the Betwa, the action at Koonch, the operations before Calpee and capture of that town.
Wounded dangerously at storming of Jhansi. Mutiny medal and class for Central India. Received complimentary letter, written by order of his Excellency Sir Hugh Rose, from Adjutant General, for "great gallantry" at the siege of Calpee -- (From Hart's Army List)

Nature of employment during service.
Arrived in India in January 1854
Joined the 23rd regiment N.I. the same year
Passed P.H. in January 1855. Interpreter's examination in July following. Obtained certificate of High Proficiency in Persian in April 1865. Served for several months previous to the mutiny of 1857, as Interpreter, 1st Light Cavalry.
After mutiny of 23rd N.I. at Mhow, attached to H.M. 86th Regiment from commencement of 1858 to fall of Calpee. Served for a short time as Interpreter to H.M. 88th Regiment. Appointed Assistant Field Engineer at Cawnpore in July 1858
Appointed Inspector of Schools, Ambalah Circle, August 1858.
Employed on special duty as a member of the Commission for revision of Hindustani test books for Military Officers.
Officiated as Director of Public Instruction, Punjab from January 1867 to April 1867, during absence in Europe of Major Fuller, Director of Public Instruction.

Major Fuller was drowned on the 20th August 1867, whilst crossing a stream near Rawl Pindi, on his way down to Murree. Captain Holroyd was thereupon ordered to take charge of the vacant office, in addition to his other duties, pending further instructions.
By a Government Order, dated 18 February 1868, Captain Holroyd, appointed Director of Public Instruction permanently, and has since held that appointment.

[This is followed by various short extracts from official documents praising him. Two are worth quoting because they describe his work]

Extract letter No 134 dated 16th March 1864, from Director P.I.P., to Secretary to Government, Punjab:

“Very great credit is, in my opinion, due to Lieutenant Holroyd as Inspector, for carrying out the scheme of Branch schools at Dehli so thoroughly, and for organising them on so efficient a basis, with the limited funds that I have from time to time being able to place at his disposal. When the Annual Statements of expenditure have been made up for each school, I feel convinced that in no city of India can education of the same standard be shown to be imparted at anything like the low average cost it bears in Dehli."

Extract from a letter No 10, dated 9th January 1865, to Colonel Norman, Secretary to the Government of India, from D. McLeod, Esq., Financial Commissioner.

“ I deem it incumbent on me, in submitting the results of our proceedings, to point out how largely the Commissioner has been interested to Lieutenant Holroyd for the exceedingly effective date he has afforded them, whereby their labours have been very greatly lightened and expedited. Being the only Military member of the Commission, and that the same time presiding as an Officer in the Educational Department over an important circle, including within it the City of Delhi which may be regarded as the fountain head of the Hindustani language, he was most favourably circumstanced for the prosecution of inquiries such as those devolving on this Commission. And no sooner did he learn that he had been selected as a Member, than he proceeded to Delhi, and there, associating with himself some of the scholars of that place, who from their combining something of European enlightenment with an appreciation of the language and literature of Hindustani, appeared best suited for this purpose, commenced upon the preparation and collection of material for meeting the requirements of the Commission."

It seems though that he may have felt aggrieved at some point - at any rate he wrote a letter dated 27th June 1862 which led to a reply from the Adjutant General dated 24th September 1863 (No. 8045) which states inter alia "This board has recorded an opinion that you behaved with great gallantry in rescuing, with Private Pearson's assistance, a wounded soldier before Calpee, but that the act, however gallant, was not, under the circumstances, deserving of the high honour of the Victoria Cross.

A footnote by Thomas Holroyd adds: It must not be inferred from this that Lieutenant Holroyd applied for the Victoria Cross, he simply pointed out that in the General Order by which the V.C. was conferred on Private Pearson for his gallantry on two occasions, the whole credit of rescuing the wounded soldier before Calpee was assigned to him, whilst Lieutenant Holroyd's name was entirely omitted, although Private Pearson was, on that occasion, acting under his orders, and a promise had been made to Lieutenant Holroyd, without any solicitation on his part, that he should be mentioned in despatches.]


Appendix L (pages 34 to 41)

Thomas Holroyd was educated at Harrow, which, however, he left early to go into the office of a Solicitor, and became afterwards a pupil of the celebrated Conveyancer, Mr Brodie. Mr Holroyd was in the Light-Horse Volunteers, and did duty at the Coronation of George the Fourth in 1821, when disturbances were apprehended in consequence of Queen Caroline’s claiming the right to enter Westminster Hall, which was refused her. The Light-Horse Volunteers (composed entirely of Gentleman, and admitted by ballot) were originally established in 1779, and did duty in the riots of 1780, for which they received the thanks of His Majesty George the Third, of the Lord Mayor and Magistrates of the City of London, and of their fellow Citizens, and were presented by His Majesty with the Standard of Light Dragoons and by the City with two other Standards. At the peace in 1783, the Officers resigned their Commissions, but in May, 1794, again offered their services to the Government, which were accepted.

During the War this Corps had some 1000 members, all splendidly mounted, and in those riotous days, particularly during the Spa Fields, Bread Riots, etc., when there was no Government Police, their services were most valuable. They had a large Barracks, Stabling, and two large riding Schools in Grays-Inn Lane, and from the top of the Arch entering their Barracks, (now the premises of Cubitts, the Builders, where the L.V. "Lion Rampant," may still be seen,) [annotated in the margin here - “Now the Royal Free Hospital”] they commanded a View of the "Spa Fields," where the riotous meetings of the day were held, and from these Barracks they kept the Government, at the Horse Guards, constantly informed of all that was going on.

Mr Holroyd abandoned the Law in 1827, and spent some time on the Continent, when he had the good fortune to give important aid in saving the town of Spa from destruction by fire, as shown in the following correspondence:

[Here followed a letter in French from the Bourgmestre of Spa, Monsieur T.F. Hayemal, praising and thanking him and enclosing an extract of a meeting of the Council of the Société d’assurance mutuelle contre l’Incendie, session of 21 November 1831 which starts:]

“M. Le Directeur expose qu’à l’occasion de l’incendie de Spa un gentilhomme anglais, Mr Thomas Holroyd, s’est particulièrement distingué par son intrépidité, son courage et son sang-froid; que c’est en mème temps à la bonne direction de ses dispositions que la société doit en grand partie de n’avoir pas de plus fortes pertes à déplorer dans cette circonstance; enfin que lors du grand incendie de Spa, le 6 Octobre, ce gentilhomme s’est comporté d’une maniére également remarquable et dévouée.”

They awarded him a silver medal which he may have collected in November, for his letter of thanks, in French, is addressed from Spa:

“Spa, le 28 Novembre, 1831

Monsieur Le Bourmestre

En vous priant d’agréer mes Remerciments pour le rapport que vous avez fait de ma conduite dans les derniers Incendies je vous supplie en même temps de rendre grâce de ma part a Monsieur le Prèsident et aux Members du Conseil de la Compagnie des assurances, pour la Medaille et la lettre trop favorable qui l’accompagnait. Bien que j’accepte avec beaucoup de plaisir ces objets de la bienvaillance de la compagnie, cependant je me serais trouvé assez récompensé, si Monsieur le Bougmestre, vous même aviez cru, que mes petits efforts ont été de quelque utilité, car, dans une clamité si terrible, nos efforts ne naissent que d’un sentiment très ordinaire, c’est à dire, le devoir sacré de secourir les malheureux.
J’espére, qu’en commun avec une foule de vos concitoyens, je n’ai pas negligé cette impusion, et voila tout ce que j’ai fait, et tout le mèrite que j’en réclame.

J’ai l’honneur d’etre,
Monsieur Le Bourmeistre,
Votre très obligé et très obèisant serviteur,
Thomas Holroyd.”


Mr Holroyd was also present during the disturbances in Belgium previously to its separation from Holland in 1830 -- 31.

On the death of this Father in 1832, Mr Thomas Holroyd preceded to Calcutta, where he was employed in winding up several of the large Agency Houses which had failed about that time; and after joining the Mercantile House the became High Sheriff of Calcutta in 1837, when her Majesty Queen Victoria came to the Throne, and had the satisfaction of presiding at the Sheriff's Meeting and assigning the Addressed to Her Majesty from the Inhabitants of Ben Gaulle, and event thus reported in the Calcutta Papers of the day --

Report of the proceedings of a GENERAL MEETING of Inhabitants of Calcutta, held at the Town Hall, on the 29th September 1837, for the purpose of voting an ADDRESS to the QUEEN.

[From the Calcutta Courier.]

The Meeting at the Town Hall today was very numerously attended, but the proportion of natives was small in consequence of the holiday. We annex a copy of the Resolutions and Address.

A little after 10, the Sheriff (Mr Holroyd) appeared in the chair, and, having first allowed the half hour to elapse, he rose and addressed the Meeting to the following effect:

Gentleman,

This is the first time that I have been called upon to preside, officially as Sheriff, at a Public Meeting of my fellow citizens, and were I not supported by a consideration of the object for which it has been convened, as well as by the conviction that your proceedings this day will be characterised by the most cordial unanimity, I should feel too much embarrassment and discomposure to venture upon addressing you. In fact upon any ordinary occasion my inclinations would carry me no further than to read the Requisition; but, on an occasion of unexampled interest like the present, when we are assembled for the purpose of congratulating a youthful Queen on her accession to the throne of her ancestors, and manifesting our loyalty and attachment, I am impelled by a mingled feeling of pardonable pride and exultation to indulge the privilege, which will be conceded to all of you, of avowing my individual devotion to her royal person.

A beautiful and accomplished woman, thrown suddenly into circumstances of trial and difficulty, before maturity of years has given confidence to her judgement, is at all times an object of interest, but how intense becomes that interest, when to her other claims upon our sympathy, can be asserted the right of a Queen to our fidelity and best affections.

Here, Gentleman, we have a Sovereign, in whom youth, beauty, intelligence and moral excellence mingled their attractions, passing, at the earliest moment that the laws of her country permit her to assume the diadem, from the comparative seclusion, to which maternal solicitude and her own passion for improvement has restricted her, to the Council Chamber of mighty empire, where, though surrounded by men of the highest civil and military attendants, she has already exhibited a degree of good sense and self-possession far beyond her years.

There is an old maxim, Gentleman, which is no doubt familiar to most of you, that "where men reign, women govern," and that "where women reign, men govern." Whether the truth of this aphorism is equal to its antiquity, it is hardly worthwhile to enquire, since to all rules there is an exception, and I shall be much mistaken, Gentleman, if our most gracious Sovereign do not, ere many years elapse, furnish that exception in her own person, by becoming, no matter who her Ministers may be, the real director of their most momentous deliberations.

Educated as she has been in the expectation of filling the exalted station to which time has called her, it cannot be doubted that she will sustain the weight of empire with dignity and glory; and that under her fostering rule measures will be multiplied for diffusion of knowledge, religious and moral, and for the spread and consolidation of social and political liberty and happiness.

In the career of improvement, India too, under her auspices will, I hope, move on pari passu with the mother country, and among other means devised for ameliorating the conditions of our native fellow subjects, we may live to see the day when our sovereign’s influence may be exerted in such a way as to to lead to a more extended scheme of female education when the philanthropist may enjoy the luxury of liberating the female mind from its living tomb, and elevating it by cultivation to something like the level of the western world. But I will not longer occupy your time, Gentleman, by dwelling on anticipations of this nature, pleasing though they be. We are assembled here to offer homage to a Sovereign, who is at this time an object of intense interest to the whole civilised world, and right cordially and enthusiastically will it, I am sure be rendered.

Before I conclude, allow me to call upon the good sense of this Meeting to refrain from all political allusions of a character to disturb the harmony of the meeting. We ought all to be, and I dare say we all are, animated by one common impulse, to proffer fealty to a Queen who, whether Her Ministers be Whig or Tory, will, I am satisfied, govern both wisely and constitutionally --

"With a firm and skilful hand
May she uphold the laws, and keep them ever
Above the proud man's violence and within
The poor man's reach."

I will now, Gentleman, for form’s sake, read the Requisition, after which I shall be happy to bespeak attention for any Gentleman, who may desire to address the Meeting……………..

[This is followed by three resolutions, two of which were seconded by people with Indian names, offering congratulations to the Queen, and an Address:]

THE ADDRESS
TO THE QUEEN'S MOST EXCELLENT MAJESTY

Most Gracious Sovereign,

We, your Majesty's subjects, of all classes, residents of the Capital of British India, beg leave to tender to your Majesty our heartfelt congratulations on the occasion of your accession to the throne of your illustrious ancestors.

In the records of their private worth and public bearing, in times of warfare and in times of peace; and in the living example of the parent, who has been mercifully spared to guide your footsteps with safety and honour to the exalted station which you occupy and adorn; we discern our guarantee that what we hail, with all our best affections awakened, will prove to us, to our children, and to our country, a blessing and a pride.

Distant as we are from the object of our homage, that homage will necessarily follow, at a long interval, the welcomes of our more fortunate fellow-subjects, assembled round you; but we doubt not your Majesty will graciously accept our tribute in the spirit in which it is proffered; and, at the moment of such gracious acceptance, we would humbly invite a benignant sympathy towards the land whence we address you.

The vast extent of its varied population (comprehending eighty millions of your subjects, and forty millions of your allies and tributaries,) with the many and magnificent plans and projects, in operation, or in prospect towards their improvement; its indigenous treasures, and its commercial wealth; it's infinite capabilities, and the increasing frequency of their beneficial development; and finally, its intrinsic value, and acknowledged important to the British Ground; are no unworthy subjects of your regard. It is the land, which has enriched, by turns, the most civilised nations of the earth, and though not cherished hitherto with the warm sympathy which it merits, has maintained its vigour and resources, and shines, as it has long shone, the brightest jewel of your diadem.

The dominion, established in British India by the arms and wisdom of your ancestors, although it may not claim to be the most perfect of human institutions, has nevertheless brought prosperity and security, where anarchy and violence had rained without control; and, when we turn from the history of the past to look upon the present, we cannot but be deeply impressed with a grateful consciousness of the vast benefits which have accrued from the Union, through which we enjoy the blessings we acknowledge.

No season can be more appropriate to the expression of such sentiments, and the assertion of our attachment to the Crown and Constitution, than that of the accession of your Majesty to the seat of empire; and we nothing doubt -- Heaven seconding our prayers -- that the name of VICTORIA shall become associated in our hearts and in our annals, with all that is noble, great and dignified.

May the Almighty Disposer of all events grant that your Majesty may long remain the chosen instrument of maintaining the honour and interest of the great Empire, which it has pleased Him to commit to your sovereignty; and of preserving to the nations, which He has entrusted to your rule, their safety, their freedom, their civil rights, and their religious liberties.”

When in Calcutta Mr Holroyd was invited to accompany Sir H. Fane the then Commander-in-Chief in India to the Court and Camp of Runjeet Singh, where he was present at all the Reviews given by Runjeet Singh of his grand Army, under the Command of General Ventura, exhibiting on one occasion 100,000 Infantry, 100 Guns, and 35,000 Cavalry, (the latter under the Command of General Allard, a French Officer). After the death of Runjeet, the Seikh Army (as is well-known) crossed the Sutlege in December 1845, in great force, which resulted in the hard fought battles of Moodkee, Ferozeshuhur, and Sobraon.


Extracts from The Bengal Sporting Magazine of December, 1838.

"It was reserved for a Gentleman of Calcutta to turn out a regular drag, and astonish the Natives with noble Coachmanship. Of this Vehicle we have given a sketch which represents the Owner springing his Team up the rise leading to Kidderpore Bridge. The Vehicle represented was a regular Brighton Coach, brought out for the Owner, Thomas Holroyd Esq., by Captain Owen of the Zenobia. As soon as it was hoisted out of the Ship, and the Wheels put on, a party was made, and the Coach started with the licensed number of twelve outside passengers, five of them ladies.

The astonishment of the Baboos was prodigious; they could not comprehend the use of the two large boots, but were quite satisfied on being informed that these were the “Babakannahs,” where the English Ladies put their Children when they travel! “Wah, Inshallah,” wonderful were the exclamations."

In January 1839, Mr Holroyd left Calcutta to settle in Gloucestershire, where he held a Captain's Commission in the Yeomanry of the late Duke of Beaufort, and was a Member of his Grace’s Hunt. Unfortunately for him he became a sleeping Partner in a large Ship Building Firm at Bristol, which failing he was obliged to revisit India; the creditors sympathising with Mr Holroyd's position unanimously restored to him much valuable property, comprising Diamonds, Pictures, and Books. Mr Holroyd returned from India for the second time in 1847, and afterwards at the solicitation of an eminent Mercantile Firm proceeded to the Indian Archipelago, and travelled as far as was then permitted over the Islands of Java, Balli, Lombock, Sumbawa, Timor, Borneo, and the Celebes, cruising among those Islands for some eighteen months in 1847 -- 48, and gaining very valuable information as to their capabilities.


Appendix M (pages 42 to 43)

William Charles Chamberlain entered the Royal Navy June, 1831, as a Volunteer of the 1st Class, with Lord James Townsend, in H.M.S. Dublin. Served as Mid-shipment in “Acteon,” Lord Edward Russell, and passing out of "Excellent," Gunnery Ship, and through the R.N. College at Portsmouth, in 1840 he was appointed Mate of "Stromboli."

At the storming of Acre Mr Chamberlain evinced great coolness and judgement in steering the first Boat of the landing party through a dangerous and intricate passage, and for the conspicuous gallantry he displayed whilst leading the storming party, -- being himself the first man to surmount the Walls, he was recommended for, and obtained, his promotion to Lieutenant, 4th November 1840. After serving for short periods in "Impregnable," "Howe," "Caledonia," "Royal William," "Hyacinth," and "Volage," Lieutenant Chamberlain was appointed to the Command of "Dwarf," (tender to the Royal Yacht,) March, 1844 to February 1845, and had several times the honour of taking the Queen and Prince Consort round the Fleet at Spithead. The "Dwarf" was also employed on special Service off the coast of Island (Commander 1845).

After commanding H.M.B. Britomart and H.M.S. Cormorant, on the West Coast of Africa (Capturing Slavers), and in the Pacific, where he was for a time Senior Officer off Rio, ill-health obliged Commander Chamberlain to go on half-pay, when he visited Malta for the sake of the Climate, and acted as Private Secretary to the Governor, Sir W. Reid, G.C.B., R.E., during the first period of the War in the Crimea, but as soon as his health was sufficiently restored he sought for employment and was sent to Command "Conflict" in the Baltic towards the end of War, and was promoted out of her to Post Rank, 21st February 1856.

The failing health of his first Wife, (Eliza, eldest daughter of Captain Basil Hall R.N., the well-known traveller and writer -- see Burk’s Baronetage,) prompted him at this time to seek for the Post of Chief Constable of Lincolnshire, and there was every reason to believe that his efforts -- aided by the very flattering testimonials he obtained from Admirals Sir B. Reynolds, Sir Houston Stuart, Sir William Bowles, Sir William Martin, Fanshawe, and other Flag Officers under whom Captain Chamberlain had served -- would have been successful, when the death of his Wife caused him to withdraw from the contest, and to again seek active Service afloat.

In May 1860, he was appointed to "Racoon" for special Service on the Coast of Syria, and was thanked by Lord J. Russell for the tact and fairness with which he negotiated several vexed questions during the disturbances then existing between Turks and Christians.

In July, 1862, Captain Chamberlain Commissioned the "Resistance" (one of the first Iron Clads) at Sheerness, and whilst in Command of her in Mediterranean, in 1865, he received, by Telegram, the flattering offer, from the Duke of Somerset, First Lord of the Admiralty, of the Command of Steam Reserve at Portsmouth, which he accepted.
In 1868, Mr Corry, then First Lord, selected him for the important post of Captain Superintendent of Chatham Dockyard, the arduous duties of which office he discharged to the entire satisfaction of two successive Controllers of the Navy, and four successive First Lords, the Admiralty testifying their confidence and approval in numerous Letters, and by retaining him in office until he obtained Flag Rank in January, 1874.

He was spoken off as the probable future Controller of the Navy -- or as one of the Junior Lords, but he asked for, and obtained, the first next vacant.Dock Yard, and was appointed, by Mr Ward Hunt, (first Lord) to be Admiral Superintendent of Devonport and Keyham Yards.

Admiral Chamberlain hoisted his Flag 12 August 1875, and devoted himself with his characteristic thoroughness to his professional duties, but his health rapidly gave way under the wear and tear of official life. On the 30th January, 1876, he was struck down by Paralysis, and finally resigned his Post in June of the same year.

(Died 27th February, 1878, at Brighton, and is there buried. Her Majesty was pleased to grant his Widow apartments in Hampton Court Palace.)


Appendix N (page 43 to 44)

The Reverend James John Holroyd, of White Hall, near Colchester, Rector of Abberton, whose death was announced in our impression of last week, was born in 1800, and was the fifth son of that eminent Judge, the late Sir George Sowley Holroyd, for many years one of His Majesty’s Justices of the Court of Kings Bench. The late Mr Holroyd was educated at Harrow School, and afterwards entered Christ College, Cambridge, where he obtained a Scholarship; he took his B.A. degree in 1830, when he was Captain of the Poll, and proceeded to M.A. in 1835. He was presented to the Rectory of Abberton by the late Lord Lyndhurst, in whom as Lord Chancellor the patronage was vested, and continued the faithful Pastor of the parish for the long period of 46 years.

He was a scholar; he excelled in modern languages -- especially German; his opinions in matters of religious faith were firm, but moderate; he was a ready speaker, courteous in demeanour, and not unmindful that the office of a Clergyman ought to be filled by a gentleman. He married, in 1833, Sophia, eldest daughter of the late Samuel Tysssen, Esq, of Narbrough Hall, Norfolk, who pre-deceased him. Of a numerous family, two sons, Captain Thyssen Holroyd and Captain F. H. Graham Holroyd, and two daughters (one married to Lieutenant General Street, C.B. and the other to Lieutenant Colonel Emilius Delmé Ratcliffe of the 88th Regiment,) survive him. He died on the 3rd February, and was buried at Abberton on Tuesday last. The mourners were confined to the immediate members of the deceased’s family; but many old friends attended at the grave as a mark of respect to his memory, while several were prevented from being present. (From an Essex paper of the day.)


Appendix O (page 44)

John Alfred Street served in the 98th Regiment with the expedition to the North of China 1842 (medal,) and was present at the attack and capture of Chingkiangfoo, and at the landing before Nankin. Embarked for the Crimea 18th September 1854, as Brigade Major, 1st Brigade, 4th Division; was present at the battles of Balaclava and Inkerman, siege and fall of Sebastopol, and expedition to Kimbourn, (medal and three clasps,) Brevet Major, C.B., Sardian and Turkish Medals, and 4th Class of. Medjidie. Colonel Street then served as Military Secretary at Gibraltar to General Sir W. F. Williams, Bart, K.C.B., the Governor, until he became a Major-General, soon after which he was appointed to command the Troops in Ceylon. (From Hart’s Army List.)


Appendix P (page 44)

Tyssen Sowley Holroyd now a Brevet Major and in the Essex Militia, was formerly Captain in the Queens 34th (the Regiment which in the Peninsula at the "Aroyos dos Molinos," captured the French 34th with their drums and Drum-Major's Staff which they used for some years;) served with them at the siege and fall of Sebastopol from the 10th August, 1855, and assault of the Redan on the 8th September, (Medal and Clasps and Turkish Medal;) is also in the campaigns in 1857 -- 59, including the actions at Cawnpore on 26th, 27th and 28th (wounded) November, 1857, capture of Meeangunge, siege and capture of Lucknow, relief of Azimghur, (was staff officer of the Azimghur Column in the Winter of 1853 -- 59,) and defeat of the rebels at Bootwul, (Medal and Clasp.) Captain Holroyd subsequently exchanged into the 23rd Royal Welch Fusiliers. (From Hart’s Army List.)

Appendix Q (page 45)

Emilius C. Delmé Radcliffe served for some years in the 88th Connaught Rangers, and was in the Eastern Campaign of 1854-55, including the battle of Alma and siege of Sebastopol, (Medal and Clasps and Turkish Medal.) (From Hart’s Army List.)


Appendix R (page 45)

John Henry Graham Holroyd served in the 65th Regiment, from 1864 to 1873, when he retired. He was present with his regiment in New Zealand during the War there, and holds the Medal. He now holds a Captain’s Commission in the 6th West York Militia (From Hart’s Army List.)

END


Full name: Shaun Lampert. Living in Kent, England (in between living in the United Arab Emirates). I am English.

The connection between me and the Holroyds is on my mother's side. My great uncle is a Holroyd Tayler, grandson of Skipwith Holroyd Tayler, who married Catherine Holroyd, one of the daughters of Henry Holroyd and Lucy Franks. Henry being one of 14 siblings, of which my great uncle remembers only 9. However, one of his sons has been tracing them through military records, especially in relation to India where most of the family served. This is where George Chaplin Holroyd comes in, as he married in Hyderabad one of the Fontaine sisters (Virginie). So Henry and George Chaplin have the same parents - Sarah Chaplin and George Sowley Holroyd. George Sowley Holroyd had 6 siblings - Mary Holroyd (1771-1787), Eleanor Holroyd (1768-1828), Jane Holroyd (1764-1766), Charlotte Holroyd (1762-1794), Mildred Holroyd (1761-1762), Henry Holroyd (1760-1780). These can easily be found on LDS. George Sowley Holroyd’s parents are apparently Eleanor Sowley (1723- ) and George Sowley (1719- ). Eleanor's father being Henry and George Holroyd's father also being Henry. A piece of George Sowley's hair is apparently in the documentation left at Oxford University, see ‘Papers of Sir Charles Edward Grey (1785-1865)’ at www.bodley.ox.ac.uk/uk/dept/scwmss/

That file gives details of the Grey family and the links to the Holroyd family, and shows the positions of the individuals concerned. Sir Charles being governor of Calcutta, and George Holroyd being governor of Putna.

As for the name Jervoise, if you check out the file above and compare to LDS, you will find his wife was Elizabeth Jervoise. The name Jervoise has continued on my side, in that I have a great uncle and cousin by that name (christian), plus there was another that my great uncle knew but cannot remember the exact relationship.
As a naughty sideline, my great uncle was told that one of the Grey's (Captain) married his secretary. The Grey's remained friends of the family for many years after returning to the UK, and my great uncle knew many of them.
I am still waiting to get the paperwork of my great uncle, but like all old people he is very forgetful nowadays. So most of my correspondence on the family is via his son, Unfortunately he lives away, like me most of the time.

Your book sounds fascinating [it turned into Dropbox, ARJ], and I would be pleased to read it. Talking of books, I gave a book to my mother on the Indian revolt, I'll get the name later this week, but there is a short passage in it on how Skipwith Tayler's father, William, and Charles Grey were involved in the insurrection. Most of the blame landed on William Tayler's shoulders and he was discredited in parliament. I'm told but have not yet found it, that there is a website detailing the parliamentary proceedings. If you want more details on the 14 sibling Holroyds, I will be happy to send what I have. And I will continue to contact my cousin (an army officer), to see if there is any more that he has found. That's all for now, I hope I may have given you a little information, and thanks for yours.
Yours Aye
Shaun
Facts
  • 31 OCT 1758 - Birth -
  • 21 NOV 1831 - Death -
  • 14 FEB 1816 - Fact -
  • 17 NOV 1828 - Fact -
  • Nobility Title - Sir
Ancestors
   
Esau Holroyd
3 FEB 1689 -
 
 
George Holroyd
9 JAN 1719 -
  
  
  
?
 
George Sowley Holroyd , Kt.
31 OCT 1758 - 21 NOV 1831
  
 
  
 
 
Eleanor Sowley
ABT 1723 -
  
  
  
?
 
Family Group Sheet - Child
PARENT (M) George Holroyd
Birth9 JAN 1719
Death
Marriageto Eleanor Sowley
FatherEsau Holroyd
Mother?
PARENT (F) Eleanor Sowley
BirthABT 1723
Death
Marriageto George Holroyd
FatherHenry Sowley
Mother?
CHILDREN
MGeorge Sowley Holroyd , Kt.
Birth31 OCT 1758
Death21 NOV 1831
Marriage10 SEP 1787to Sarah Chaplin
Marriageto ?
MHenry Holroyd
Birth7 APR 1760
Death16 APR 1780
FMildred Holroyd
Birth11 APR 1761
Death20 OCT 1762
FCharlotte Holroyd
Birth30 APR 1762
Death30 MAR 1794
FJane Holroyd
BirthMAY 1764
Death9 JAN 1766
FEleanor Holroyd
Birth18 MAY 1768
Death7 MAR 1828
Marriage9 FEB 1797to William Glass
FMary Holroyd
Birth2 FEB 1771
Death14 OCT 1787
Family Group Sheet - Spouse
PARENT (M) George Sowley Holroyd , Kt.
Birth31 OCT 1758
Death21 NOV 1831
Marriage10 SEP 1787to Sarah Chaplin
Marriageto ?
FatherGeorge Holroyd
MotherEleanor Sowley
PARENT (F) Sarah Chaplin
Birth18 JUN 1768
Death11 NOV 1848 Exmouth,Devon.
Marriage10 SEP 1787to George Sowley Holroyd , Kt.
FatherAmos Chaplin
MotherMaria.A. von Stocken
CHILDREN
FMary Anne Holroyd
Birth31 DEC 1788
Death14 MAY 1813
Marriage4 DEC 1810to Charles Court
MGeorge Chaplin Holroyd
Birth9 SEP 1790
Death24 NOV 1871
Marriage2 APR 1818to Virginie de la Fontaine at Hyderabad, Deccan, India
Marriageto Fanny Harrington
MCharles Holroyd
Birth31 JAN 1792
Death13 SEP 1830Mominabad, East Indies, without issue
MHenry Amos Holroyd
Birth24 MAY 1793
Death23 FEB 1794Hampstead
MEdward Holroyd
Birth24 JUL 1794
Death29 JAN 1881
Marriage28 DEC 1820to Caroline Pugsley
FSarah Louisa Holroyd
Birth4 JUL 1796
Death11 JAN 1876
MFrederick Court Holroyd
Birth28 NOV 1797
DeathHampstead, an infant. Buried there.
MThomas Holroyd
Birth23 MAR 1799
Death27 NOV 1893Hampton Court
Marriage5 JUL 1823to Sarah Morgan
MJames John Holroyd , Rev
Birth28 SEP 1800
Death3 FEB 1876
Marriage12 SEP 1833to Sophia Tyssen
MWilliam James Holroyd
Birth20 AUG 1802
Death6 MAR 1803Buried in Hampstead
MHenry Holroyd
Birth5 APR 1804
Death29 SEP 1859Calcutta, India
Marriage8 DEC 1831to Lucy Franks
FSarah Maria Holroyd
Birth26 MAY 1805
Death3 AUG 1815Brighton
FCharlotte Holroyd
Birth8 SEP 1806
Death30 JUN 1811Hampstead, London
MFrederick Holroyd
Birth14 MAR 1810
Death29 JUN 1811Hampstead, London
Family Group Sheet - Spouse
PARENT (M) George Sowley Holroyd , Kt.
Birth31 OCT 1758
Death21 NOV 1831
Marriage10 SEP 1787to Sarah Chaplin
Marriageto ?
FatherGeorge Holroyd
MotherEleanor Sowley
PARENT (U) ?
Birth
Death
Father?
Mother?
CHILDREN
FMary Anne Holroyd
Birth31 DEC 1788
Death14 MAY 1813
Marriage4 DEC 1810to Charles Court
MGeorge Chaplin Holroyd
Birth9 SEP 1790
Death24 NOV 1871
Marriage2 APR 1818to Virginie de la Fontaine at Hyderabad, Deccan, India
Marriageto Fanny Harrington
MCharles Holroyd
Birth31 JAN 1792
Death13 SEP 1830Mominabad, East Indies, without issue
MHenry Amos Holroyd
Birth24 MAY 1793
Death23 FEB 1794Hampstead
MEdward Holroyd
Birth24 JUL 1794
Death29 JAN 1881
Marriage28 DEC 1820to Caroline Pugsley
FSarah Louisa Holroyd
Birth4 JUL 1796
Death11 JAN 1876
MFrederick Court Holroyd
Birth28 NOV 1797
DeathHampstead, an infant. Buried there.
MThomas Holroyd
Birth23 MAR 1799
Death27 NOV 1893Hampton Court
Marriage5 JUL 1823to Sarah Morgan
MJames John Holroyd , Rev
Birth28 SEP 1800
Death3 FEB 1876
Marriage12 SEP 1833to Sophia Tyssen
MWilliam James Holroyd
Birth20 AUG 1802
Death6 MAR 1803Buried in Hampstead
MHenry Holroyd
Birth5 APR 1804
Death29 SEP 1859Calcutta, India
Marriage8 DEC 1831to Lucy Franks
FSarah Maria Holroyd
Birth26 MAY 1805
Death3 AUG 1815Brighton
FCharlotte Holroyd
Birth8 SEP 1806
Death30 JUN 1811Hampstead, London
MFrederick Holroyd
Birth14 MAR 1810
Death29 JUN 1811Hampstead, London
Descendancy Chart
George Sowley Holroyd , Kt. b: 31 OCT 1758 d: 21 NOV 1831
Sarah Chaplin b: 18 JUN 1768 d: 11 NOV 1848
Mary Anne Holroyd b: 31 DEC 1788 d: 14 MAY 1813
Charles Court b: ABT 1784 d: 9 SEP 1821
Daughter Court b: 1812 d: 1812
George Chaplin Holroyd b: 9 SEP 1790 d: 24 NOV 1871
Virginie de la Fontaine d: 1 AUG 1845
Mary Anne Holroyd b: 8 AUG 1829
Virginie Lucy Mills b: 15 MAY 1851
Mary Anne Mills b: 1 DEC 1852
Ada Mills b: 5 NOV 1856
Henry Holroyd Mills b: 20 SEP 1860
William Holroyd Mills b: 14 SEP 1862
Catherine Mills b: 26 SEP 1863
Agnes Mills b: 12 JAN 1870
Priscilla Mills b: 27 JAN 1872
Virginie Holroyd b: 29 JAN 1835
Mary Virginie Mills b: 7 JUL 1864
Katharine Mills b: 9 OCT 1869
George Holroyd b: 18 FEB 1819
Emily Garstin b: 1823
Emily Mary Anne Holroyd b: 10 JUL 1846 d: 16 JUL 1847
George Augustus Holroyd b: 29 NOV 1847 d: 1860
Emmeline Louisa Holroyd b: 22 AUG 1849
Kate Virginie Holroyd b: 15 DEC 1851
Georgiana Kate Martelli b: 14 NOV 1873
Emelyn Irene Martelli b: 26 DEC 1874
Kate Virginie Martelli b: 2 OCT 1877
Henry William Holroyd b: 26 MAR 1854 d: 1894
Florence May Holroyd b: 5 FEB 1861
Henry Holroyd b: 14 JUL 1820
Louisa Gordon Holroyd b: 13 JAN 1860
Mary Virginia Holroyd b: 25 JUN 1861
Henrietta Holroyd b: 10 MAY 1863
Charles Holroyd b: 16 OCT 1822
Mary Florence d: 31 AUG 1863
Anna Eliza Smith d: 7 JAN 1880
Patrick Charles Holroyd b: 4 JUN 1874
Norah Palmer Holroyd b: 30 JAN 1877
John Holroyd Doveton b: 20 DEC 1823
John George Holroyd Doveton b: 29 JUL 1848 d: 23 APR 1864
Mary Holroyd Doveton b: 16 SEP 1854 d: 21 SEP 1854
James Amand Holroyd Doveton b: 13 MAY 1856
Fanny Harrington d: 25 MAR 1874
Charles Holroyd b: 31 JAN 1792 d: 13 SEP 1830
Henry Amos Holroyd b: 24 MAY 1793 d: 23 FEB 1794
Edward Holroyd b: 24 JUL 1794 d: 29 JAN 1881
Sarah Louisa Holroyd b: 6 OCT 1821
Arthur Edward Margetts b: 25 DEC 1856 d: 25 AUG 1880
Caroline Edith Margetts b: 2 MAR 1859 d: 1884
Francis Edward Margetts b: 25 APR 1860 d: 1881
Amy Louisa Margetts b: 5 FEB 1862
Eleanor Charlotte Margetts b: 26 NOV 1863 d: 10 NOV 1880
Catherine Anna Margetts b: 26 NOV 1863 d: 10 NOV 1880
George Frederic Holroyd b: 6 MAY 1824 d: 15 SEP 1874
Charlotte Lavinia Johnson b: 1828 d: 29 NOV 1870
Gertrude Beryl Holroyd b: 26 JUL 1866
Brenda Holroyd b: 20 FEB 1868 d: 20 MAR 1868
Minna Holroyd b: 20 FEB 1868
Violette Holroyd b: 19 NOV 1870 d: 6 JAN 1871
Edward Dundas Holroyd , QC b: 25 JAN 1828 d: 5 JAN 1916
Catherine Compton Holroyd b: 1 FEB 1863
Ethel Hardman Holroyd b: 17 APR 1864
?
Arthur George Holroyd b: 15 MAY 1865
Spencer Edward Holroyd b: 2 MAR 1867
Sophie Marion Holroyd b: 4 SEP 1870
Arthur Holroyd b: 3 MAR 1833 d: 30 MAR 1835
Alice Marion Holroyd b: 11 AUG 1868 d: 2 MAY 1869
Geraldine Holroyd b: 21 AUG 1869
Lucy Beatrice Holroyd b: 3 JAN 1873
Caroline Holroyd b: 31 MAR 1838
Sarah Louisa Holroyd b: 4 JUL 1796 d: 11 JAN 1876
Frederick Court Holroyd b: 28 NOV 1797
Thomas Holroyd b: 23 MAR 1799 d: 27 NOV 1893
Sarah Morgan b: 1803 d: 29 JUN 1853
Sarah Morgan Holroyd b: ABT 1824
William Charles Chamberlain , RN b: 21 APR 1818 d: 27 FEB 1878
James John Holroyd , Rev b: 28 SEP 1800 d: 3 FEB 1876
Sophia Tyssen b: 1804 d: 5 JUL 1870
Sophia Baker Holroyd b: 27 JUN 1834 d: 15 DEC 1874
Sophie Catherine Street b: 27 JUL 1872
Louisa Mary Street b: 18 APR 1864
Charlotte Henrietta Holroyd b: 2 MAY 1836 d: 22 APR 1850
Tyssen Sowley Holroyd b: 11 JAN 1839
Mary Anne Jane Corbett b: ABT 1843
Mary Anne Thesiger Holroyd b: 24 FEB 1840 d: 11 MAY 1850
Louisa Boddicot Holroyd b: 14 MAR 1842
Charles Radcliffe b: 21 SEP 1864
Henry Radcliffe b: 30 MAR 1866
George Vaughan Radcliffe b: 6 JUN 1867 d: 7 SEP 1868
Marian Louisa Radcliffe b: 13 APR 1870
John Frederick Radcliffe b: 15 DEC 1871 d: 1882
Seymour Arthur Radcliffe b: 16 AUG 1873
Alfred Radcliffe b: 1879
George Ridley Holroyd b: 6 FEB 1844 d: 14 JUL 1850
John Henry Graham Holroyd b: 5 APR 1846
Ada Lilian Louisa Holroyd b: 6 JAN 1876
Helena Anna Mary Holroyd b: 7 MAR 1877
James William Holroyd b: 13 FEB 1848 d: 4 MAR 1848
Charles Whish Holroyd b: 13 FEB 1849
William James Holroyd b: 20 AUG 1802 d: 6 MAR 1803
Henry Holroyd b: 5 APR 1804 d: 29 SEP 1859
Lucy Franks b: ABT 1808 d: 29 SEP 1859
Elizabeth Holroyd b: 18 SEP 1832
Catherine Holroyd b: 8 DEC 1834 d: 9 OCT 1857
Henry Graham Tayler b: 8 NOV 1855
?
Lucy Sarah Holroyd b: 31 AUG 1837
Edward Grey , BCS b: ABT 1833
Catherine Lucy Grey b: 23 SEP 1864
Mary Elizabeth Grey b: 17 AUG 1865 d: 19 JAN 1866
Charles Edward Grey b: 16 DEC 1866
Ralph Henry Grey b: 30 NOV 1868
George Sowley Holroyd b: 23 DEC 1841 d: 7 SEP 1870
Sarah Maria Holroyd b: 26 MAY 1805 d: 3 AUG 1815
Charlotte Holroyd b: 8 SEP 1806 d: 30 JUN 1811
Frederick Holroyd b: 14 MAR 1810 d: 29 JUN 1811
?
Mary Anne Holroyd b: 31 DEC 1788 d: 14 MAY 1813
Charles Court b: ABT 1784 d: 9 SEP 1821
Daughter Court b: 1812 d: 1812
George Chaplin Holroyd b: 9 SEP 1790 d: 24 NOV 1871
Virginie de la Fontaine d: 1 AUG 1845
Mary Anne Holroyd b: 8 AUG 1829
Virginie Lucy Mills b: 15 MAY 1851
Mary Anne Mills b: 1 DEC 1852
Ada Mills b: 5 NOV 1856
Henry Holroyd Mills b: 20 SEP 1860
William Holroyd Mills b: 14 SEP 1862
Catherine Mills b: 26 SEP 1863
Agnes Mills b: 12 JAN 1870
Priscilla Mills b: 27 JAN 1872
Virginie Holroyd b: 29 JAN 1835
Mary Virginie Mills b: 7 JUL 1864
Katharine Mills b: 9 OCT 1869
George Holroyd b: 18 FEB 1819
Emily Garstin b: 1823
Emily Mary Anne Holroyd b: 10 JUL 1846 d: 16 JUL 1847
George Augustus Holroyd b: 29 NOV 1847 d: 1860
Emmeline Louisa Holroyd b: 22 AUG 1849
Kate Virginie Holroyd b: 15 DEC 1851
Georgiana Kate Martelli b: 14 NOV 1873
Emelyn Irene Martelli b: 26 DEC 1874
Kate Virginie Martelli b: 2 OCT 1877
Henry William Holroyd b: 26 MAR 1854 d: 1894
Florence May Holroyd b: 5 FEB 1861
Henry Holroyd b: 14 JUL 1820
Louisa Gordon Holroyd b: 13 JAN 1860
Mary Virginia Holroyd b: 25 JUN 1861
Henrietta Holroyd b: 10 MAY 1863
Charles Holroyd b: 16 OCT 1822
Mary Florence d: 31 AUG 1863
Anna Eliza Smith d: 7 JAN 1880
Patrick Charles Holroyd b: 4 JUN 1874
Norah Palmer Holroyd b: 30 JAN 1877
John Holroyd Doveton b: 20 DEC 1823
John George Holroyd Doveton b: 29 JUL 1848 d: 23 APR 1864
Mary Holroyd Doveton b: 16 SEP 1854 d: 21 SEP 1854
James Amand Holroyd Doveton b: 13 MAY 1856
Fanny Harrington d: 25 MAR 1874
Charles Holroyd b: 31 JAN 1792 d: 13 SEP 1830
Henry Amos Holroyd b: 24 MAY 1793 d: 23 FEB 1794
Edward Holroyd b: 24 JUL 1794 d: 29 JAN 1881
Sarah Louisa Holroyd b: 6 OCT 1821
Arthur Edward Margetts b: 25 DEC 1856 d: 25 AUG 1880
Caroline Edith Margetts b: 2 MAR 1859 d: 1884
Francis Edward Margetts b: 25 APR 1860 d: 1881
Amy Louisa Margetts b: 5 FEB 1862
Eleanor Charlotte Margetts b: 26 NOV 1863 d: 10 NOV 1880
Catherine Anna Margetts b: 26 NOV 1863 d: 10 NOV 1880
George Frederic Holroyd b: 6 MAY 1824 d: 15 SEP 1874
Charlotte Lavinia Johnson b: 1828 d: 29 NOV 1870
Gertrude Beryl Holroyd b: 26 JUL 1866
Brenda Holroyd b: 20 FEB 1868 d: 20 MAR 1868
Minna Holroyd b: 20 FEB 1868
Violette Holroyd b: 19 NOV 1870 d: 6 JAN 1871
Edward Dundas Holroyd , QC b: 25 JAN 1828 d: 5 JAN 1916
Catherine Compton Holroyd b: 1 FEB 1863
Ethel Hardman Holroyd b: 17 APR 1864
?
Arthur George Holroyd b: 15 MAY 1865
Spencer Edward Holroyd b: 2 MAR 1867
Sophie Marion Holroyd b: 4 SEP 1870
Arthur Holroyd b: 3 MAR 1833 d: 30 MAR 1835
Alice Marion Holroyd b: 11 AUG 1868 d: 2 MAY 1869
Geraldine Holroyd b: 21 AUG 1869
Lucy Beatrice Holroyd b: 3 JAN 1873
Caroline Holroyd b: 31 MAR 1838
Sarah Louisa Holroyd b: 4 JUL 1796 d: 11 JAN 1876
Frederick Court Holroyd b: 28 NOV 1797
Thomas Holroyd b: 23 MAR 1799 d: 27 NOV 1893
Sarah Morgan b: 1803 d: 29 JUN 1853
Sarah Morgan Holroyd b: ABT 1824
William Charles Chamberlain , RN b: 21 APR 1818 d: 27 FEB 1878
James John Holroyd , Rev b: 28 SEP 1800 d: 3 FEB 1876
Sophia Tyssen b: 1804 d: 5 JUL 1870
Sophia Baker Holroyd b: 27 JUN 1834 d: 15 DEC 1874
Sophie Catherine Street b: 27 JUL 1872
Louisa Mary Street b: 18 APR 1864
Charlotte Henrietta Holroyd b: 2 MAY 1836 d: 22 APR 1850
Tyssen Sowley Holroyd b: 11 JAN 1839
Mary Anne Jane Corbett b: ABT 1843
Mary Anne Thesiger Holroyd b: 24 FEB 1840 d: 11 MAY 1850
Louisa Boddicot Holroyd b: 14 MAR 1842
Charles Radcliffe b: 21 SEP 1864
Henry Radcliffe b: 30 MAR 1866
George Vaughan Radcliffe b: 6 JUN 1867 d: 7 SEP 1868
Marian Louisa Radcliffe b: 13 APR 1870
John Frederick Radcliffe b: 15 DEC 1871 d: 1882
Seymour Arthur Radcliffe b: 16 AUG 1873
Alfred Radcliffe b: 1879
George Ridley Holroyd b: 6 FEB 1844 d: 14 JUL 1850
John Henry Graham Holroyd b: 5 APR 1846
Ada Lilian Louisa Holroyd b: 6 JAN 1876
Helena Anna Mary Holroyd b: 7 MAR 1877
James William Holroyd b: 13 FEB 1848 d: 4 MAR 1848
Charles Whish Holroyd b: 13 FEB 1849
William James Holroyd b: 20 AUG 1802 d: 6 MAR 1803
Henry Holroyd b: 5 APR 1804 d: 29 SEP 1859
Lucy Franks b: ABT 1808 d: 29 SEP 1859
Elizabeth Holroyd b: 18 SEP 1832
Catherine Holroyd b: 8 DEC 1834 d: 9 OCT 1857
Henry Graham Tayler b: 8 NOV 1855
?
Lucy Sarah Holroyd b: 31 AUG 1837
Edward Grey , BCS b: ABT 1833
Catherine Lucy Grey b: 23 SEP 1864
Mary Elizabeth Grey b: 17 AUG 1865 d: 19 JAN 1866
Charles Edward Grey b: 16 DEC 1866
Ralph Henry Grey b: 30 NOV 1868
George Sowley Holroyd b: 23 DEC 1841 d: 7 SEP 1870
Sarah Maria Holroyd b: 26 MAY 1805 d: 3 AUG 1815
Charlotte Holroyd b: 8 SEP 1806 d: 30 JUN 1811
Frederick Holroyd b: 14 MAR 1810 d: 29 JUN 1811