William Wyndham Grenville , Lord

William Wyndham Grenville , Lord

b: 25 OCT 1759
d: 12 JAN 1834
Passages mentioning the Grenvilles in 'Prince of Pleasure - the Prince of Wales and the Making of the Regency' by Saul David, publ. Abacus 1999:


p.219
Fox...... was keen for the Prince to take a more active role in politics. In November 1803, shortly after negotiations between the Foxite Whigs, the Carlton House group and Addington had one again foundered, Fox warned Grey that '.................'. If only the Prince would 'take a decided part against the present system, he would soon find himself at the head of a great and respectable party ... and I think it most probable that great numbers even of Pitt's friends would (without entirely breaking with their leader) range under his standard.'

Fox was particularly referring to the Grenvellites - led by Lord Grenville and his brother the Marquess of Buckingham - who, like him, were opposed to Addington's conduct of the war on the one hand, and supportive of Catholic emancipation on the other. However, the Prince's enthusiasm for the latter policy seemed to be waning...........


p.319
On 19 June 1811, with the King [George III] showing no signs of recovery, the Prince held a grand fete at Carlton House to celebrate the inauguration of the Regency. Heading the huge list of 2,000 guests were the members of the exiled French Royal Family, including the Comtes de Provence and d'Artois (the future Louis XVIII and Charles X respectively), the Ducs de Berri and de Bourbon, and Louis XVI's sole surviving child, the Duchesse d'Angouleme........ [see also 'The Chaplin and Skinner Families.doc', section on the Nugent Family, search for 'Angoul'].


p.324 and following pages:
In a letter to the Marquis, his brother, on 6 January 1812, Lord Grenville was in no doubt as to the Regent's intentions: 'The Prince is still very unwell......... I suspect the pretence about the Catholics is to be that it will be indelicate to do anything for them, so long as the King lives. That is very possibly, and not improbably, for fifteen or twenty years more.......... I am......., God be thanked, out of the question. There is no misery I should dread, like that of undertaking in such a state of the court and country, any share in the government of either'.
From the biographical information on William Wilberforce in Wikipedia:

[on the abolition of the slave trade, Grenville being Prime Minister]

The death of Fox in September 1806 was a blow to the abolitionists. Wilberforce was again re-elected for Yorkshire after Grenville called for a general election. He and Clarkson had collected a large volume of evidence against the slave trade over the previous two decades. Wilberforce spent the latter part of the year following the election writing A Letter on the Abolition of the Slave Trade, which was an apologetic essay summarizing this evidence. After it was published on 31 January 1807, it formed the basis for the final phase of the campaign.

Lord Grenville had introduced an Abolition Bill in the House of Lords, and made an impassioned speech, during which he criticized fellow members for "not having abolished the trade long ago," and argued that the trade was "contrary to the principles of justice, humanity and sound policy." When a final vote was taken the bill was passed in the House of Lords by the unexpectedly large margin of 41 votes to 20. Sensing a breakthrough that had been long anticipated, Charles Grey (now Viscount Howick) moved for a second reading in the Commons on 23 February. As tributes were made to Wilberforce, who had laboured for the cause during the preceding twenty years, the bill was carried by 283 votes to 16. The Slave Trade Act received the royal assent on 25 March 1807.
Biography
Passages mentioning the Grenvilles in 'Prince of Pleasure - the Prince of Wales and the Making of the Regency' by Saul David, publ. Abacus 1999:


p.219
Fox...... was keen for the Prince to take a more active role in politics. In November 1803, shortly after negotiations between the Foxite Whigs, the Carlton House group and Addington had one again foundered, Fox warned Grey that '.................'. If only the Prince would 'take a decided part against the present system, he would soon find himself at the head of a great and respectable party ... and I think it most probable that great numbers even of Pitt's friends would (without entirely breaking with their leader) range under his standard.'

Fox was particularly referring to the Grenvellites - led by Lord Grenville and his brother the Marquess of Buckingham - who, like him, were opposed to Addington's conduct of the war on the one hand, and supportive of Catholic emancipation on the other. However, the Prince's enthusiasm for the latter policy seemed to be waning...........


p.319
On 19 June 1811, with the King [George III] showing no signs of recovery, the Prince held a grand fete at Carlton House to celebrate the inauguration of the Regency. Heading the huge list of 2,000 guests were the members of the exiled French Royal Family, including the Comtes de Provence and d'Artois (the future Louis XVIII and Charles X respectively), the Ducs de Berri and de Bourbon, and Louis XVI's sole surviving child, the Duchesse d'Angouleme........ [see also 'The Chaplin and Skinner Families.doc', section on the Nugent Family, search for 'Angoul'].


p.324 and following pages:
In a letter to the Marquis, his brother, on 6 January 1812, Lord Grenville was in no doubt as to the Regent's intentions: 'The Prince is still very unwell......... I suspect the pretence about the Catholics is to be that it will be indelicate to do anything for them, so long as the King lives. That is very possibly, and not improbably, for fifteen or twenty years more.......... I am......., God be thanked, out of the question. There is no misery I should dread, like that of undertaking in such a state of the court and country, any share in the government of either'. From the biographical information on William Wilberforce in Wikipedia:

[on the abolition of the slave trade, Grenville being Prime Minister]

The death of Fox in September 1806 was a blow to the abolitionists. Wilberforce was again re-elected for Yorkshire after Grenville called for a general election. He and Clarkson had collected a large volume of evidence against the slave trade over the previous two decades. Wilberforce spent the latter part of the year following the election writing A Letter on the Abolition of the Slave Trade, which was an apologetic essay summarizing this evidence. After it was published on 31 January 1807, it formed the basis for the final phase of the campaign.

Lord Grenville had introduced an Abolition Bill in the House of Lords, and made an impassioned speech, during which he criticized fellow members for "not having abolished the trade long ago," and argued that the trade was "contrary to the principles of justice, humanity and sound policy." When a final vote was taken the bill was passed in the House of Lords by the unexpectedly large margin of 41 votes to 20. Sensing a breakthrough that had been long anticipated, Charles Grey (now Viscount Howick) moved for a second reading in the Commons on 23 February. As tributes were made to Wilberforce, who had laboured for the cause during the preceding twenty years, the bill was carried by 283 votes to 16. The Slave Trade Act received the royal assent on 25 March 1807.
Facts
  • 25 OCT 1759 - Birth -
  • 12 JAN 1834 - Death -
  • BET 1806 AND 1807 - Fact -
  • Occupation - Whig statesman, Prime Minister
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William Wyndham Grenville , Lord
25 OCT 1759 - 12 JAN 1834
  
 
  
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Family Group Sheet - Child
PARENT (U) ?
Birth
Death
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Mother?
PARENT (U) ?
Birth
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CHILDREN
MWilliam Wyndham Grenville , Lord
Birth25 OCT 1759
Death12 JAN 1834
MGeorge Nugent Temple Grenville
Birth
Death
Marriage16 APR 1775to Mary Elizabeth Nugent